Commentaries

WKMS welcomes community members to self-voice self-authored compositions that express opinion, introspection or humor on topics of interest and importance to our audience. If you have an opinion, interest or review you'd like to share with WKMS listeners, please see the guidelines below. The views expressed in commentaries are the opinion of the commentator and don't necessarily reflect the views of WKMS.

The station will review every script before it is recorded with respect to:

  1. Libel or slander.
  2. Content that is more promotional than provocative.
  3. Accuracy.
  4. Personal attacks and ad hominem attacks.
  5. Political or religious content that promotes rather than informs.
  6. Appropriate usage, language and form for civil discourse.

The station will assist authors with:

  1. Making appropriate edits.
  2. Bringing the communication to proper time length, generally about 600 words or 3 to 4 minutes of spoken word.
  3. Recording the communication in the WKMS studio (unless other arrangements that yield equally acceptable audio are agreed to).
  4. Editing the communication and placing it in the WKMS schedule.

WKMS will require authors to provide the station a final script that will be filed in the news department and will be placed on the station's web site.

WKMS will need authors to provide a suggested introduction for each communication as well as a standard announcer outro script that includes author name, general place of residence, and whatever other personal information might lend authority or authenticity to the communication.

WKMS will schedule produced communications and inform the author of time(s). Generally these are aired three times each, but the rotation is solely at the discretion of the station.

WKMS will refuse to air communications that violate rules of the Federal Communications Commission for non-commercial, educational stations. Further, WKMS will refuse to air communications that would, for any reason, undermine its goodwill with the audience it serves.

If you find these terms agreeable, please email msu.wkmsnews@murraystate.edu to schedule a time in a studio to record.

Alexandra Kanik, Ohio Valley ReSource

Whoever wins the presidency in 2016, one of the central issues they'll face is the concern of many voters that American jobs are falling victim to free trade while wages stagnate. Murray State University Professor Emeritus of History and Commentator Dr. Bill Schell breaks down this concern and offers a way the next White House occupant could address it.

Over this past summer, long-time public radio host Garrison Keillor announced his retirement from A Prairie Home Companion, in a slow transition during their 2015-2016 season. His replacement is singer and mandolinist (and for a time a Murray State student) Chris Thile best known as part of Nickel Creek and Punch Brothers. Commentator Dr. Brian Clardy grew up listening to A Prairie Home Companion and says the change prompts him to reflect on other transitions in life.

Courtesy of Swank Motion Pictures, Warner Brothers

Andrew Black of Murray State's Cinema International ponders artificial intelligence and what it means to be human ahead of tonight's showing of Blade Runner The Final Cut at Murray State's Curris Center Theatre.

"Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" Well, if they do, doesn’t that make them essentially human? Tales of computers coming to life come out all the time, and while we’ve yet to enter the Matrix, we still think about what would happen if our technology decided to take on a mind of its own. Maybe we’re not so worried that our toaster or our alarm clock is going to take over the world, but we continue to be gripped by concepts of “artificial intelligence.” 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Note: The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the commentator and don't necessarily reflect the views of WKMS.

As world leaders and U.S. presidential candidates react to the historic agreement between P5+1 countries including the United States and Iran regarding their nuclear program, Murray State history professor with a focus on diplomatic history Dr. Brian Clardy weighs in with his thoughts on the deal putting into context events of the late 1970s and mid 1980s.

Chad Lampe, WKMS

Murray State welcomed NBC News' Chuck Todd to campus Tuesday for their Presidential Lecture Series, sponsored by the President's Office, Student Government Association and the MSU Foundation. Commentator and Murray State History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on the annual series and his formative years as a "political junkie" attending University of Tennesee at Martin.

commonwealthpolicycenter.org

Many Kentucky lawmakers are calling a local option sales tax their highest priority this legislative session. The legislation would allow local governments to put public projects on the ballot and allow residents to vote on paying a sales tax to fund the project. This bill has been an issue among conservative groups, namely the United Kentucky Tea Party. Commentator Richard Nelson takes issue with the proposal and says Kentuckians are already over-taxed.

Pages