white supremacists

Last weekend, when white nationalists descended on Charlottesville to protest, it was clear that almost exclusively white, young males comprised the so-called alt-right movement — there were women, but very few.

So where were the white women who weren't out protesting in the streets?

For the most part, journalist Seyward Darby discovered, they're online.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A small number of right-wing "Free Speech Rally" demonstrators disbanded early from Boston Common after they were confronted by thousands of counterprotesters shouting anti-Nazi and anti-KKK slogans.

Deborah Becker, a reporter with member station WBUR in Boston, said that "a few dozen" rally attendees were escorted from Parkman Bandstand by police and placed into police vehicles "for their own safety."

Spotify and other streaming services have begun removing white supremacist content from their platforms, as websites and musicians alike scramble to distance themselves from the white nationalist movement.

In a statement on Wednesday, Spotify blamed the labels and distributors that supply music to its database but said "material that favors hatred or incites violence against race, religion, sexuality or the like is not tolerated by us. Spotify takes immediate action to remove any such material as soon as it has been brought to our attention."

comer.house.gov, cropped

Republican U.S. Congressman James Comer says there are no 'good guys' in the neo-Nazi and white nationalist movement. 

Charles Compton / WEKU News

White supremacist flyers have circulated around the campus of Eastern Kentucky University that claim a “non-violent genocide” has been launched against so-called “white countries.”  

University spokesman Marc Whitt confirmed several flyers were posted in classroom buildings that serve police and firefighter trainees.  Whitt said an official investigation is underway.