War of 1812

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The War of 1812 was considered by many Kentuckians to be their war as control over the Mississippi River was at stake. This struggle culminated in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815. At the peak of this decisive American victory is one man: a western Kentuckian named Ephraim Brank of Muhlenberg County. Historian James Claypool joins us on Sounds Good to tell us the story of the Kentucky sharpshooter that broke the British resolve and promoted their retreat.


The “Raisin”—short for the River Raisin that runs by the site—was the first national battlefield park devoted to the War of 1812. And it’s no Gettysburg, but rather a small patch of “brownfield” - ground contaminated by industry - south of Detroit. Thursday at 7 p.m. the McCracken County Public Library hosts author and historian Eddie Price for its Evenings Upstairs program - titled "Remember The Raisin!" Kentucky's Contribution in the War of 1812. Mr. Price joins Kate Lochte for a preview.

Wikimedia Commons

June marked the bicentennial of the start of the War of 1812.  Not many Kentuckians know much about the conflict, aside from the burning of the White House, and “The Star-Spangled Banner.”  Even fewer know about the role the Commonwealth played in it, despite the fact that if you live in the Jackson Purchase, you likely live in a county named for a soldier who fought and died in one battle of the War of 1812: Major Bland Ballard, Major Benjamin Graves, Captain Paschal Hickman, and Captain Virgil McCracken.  

Calloway Countian Preserves 1812 Veterans' Graves

Jul 8, 2012

The War of 1812 is sometimes called the second war for independence. It’s also called the forgotten war, as it was overshadowed fifty years later by a much bloodier war. Kentuckians were an important part of the 1812 war effort. The Commonwealth contributed more to the casualty list than any other state. Soldiers buried in western Kentucky fought in campaigns from Canada to New Orleans, with a few under the command of then-General and future president Andrew Jackson. Angela Hatton went searching for their graves.