vaccinations

Vaccine progress is stalling.

That's the message from a new report issued by the World Health Organization and UNICEF.

The report focuses on the DTP vaccine — the essential vaccine that protects kids against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough) and that was first licensed in 1949.

News this summer of a flu vaccine patch sparked a lot of chatter. Could getting vaccinated be as easy as putting on a bandage? Could there be fewer, or at least smaller, needles in our future?

Some companies and academic labs are working to make those things happen.

They're refining technologies that involve tiny needles, less than a millimeter long, and needle-free injectors that can send a dose of vaccine through your skin in a fraction of a second.

Some of these technologies are already available on the market, while others are still being tested.

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Incoming freshmen college students would be required to get immunizations and vaccines before starting classes under a bill passed Thursday by a Kentucky House committee.

via CDC webpage for photos of the mumps

Though it might be hard to remember, most everyone gets the Measles, Mumps and Rubella, or MMR, vaccine when they are young. But according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, reports of the mumps have jumped from just over 1,000 cases in 2015 to over 4,000 cases and counting in 2016, and the majority of those numbers can be found in the Midwest.

A seizure caused by a fever in a young child can be terrifying, and some parents worry that the occasional fever that can follow a vaccine may cause one. But febrile seizures after vaccines are rare, a study finds, affecting 3 children out of 10,000. And children almost always recover completely.

Nothing like a good measles outbreak to get people thinking more kindly about vaccines.

One third of parents say they think vaccines have more benefit than they did a year ago, according to a poll conducted in May.

That's compared to the 5 percent of parents who said they now think vaccines have fewer benefits and 61 percent who think the benefits are the same.

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A new Illinois law requires whooping cough vaccinations for students entering 6th and 9th grades this school year. The law requires those students to show proof they received the Tdap vaccine. Tdap is a booster shot against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough. Illinois has seen about 1,200 cases of whooping cough this year, compared to 468 cases reported as of August 1st last year.

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Illinois health officials are calling attention to an increase in whooping cough cases this year as they remind parents about required immunizations for children. Approximately 1,200 cases of whooping cough have been reported in the state so far this year. That's compared to 468 cases reported as of last August. Sixth- and ninth-grade students are now required to show proof of receiving the Tdap vaccine for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, better known as whooping cough.