U.S. Supreme Court

Underlying the debate over Apple's refusal to help the FBI unlock the iPhone of San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook is the idea that cellphones hold the most intimate details of our daily lives. That wasn't always so obvious. As the role of technology changes, so have our attitudes, and one of the places to see this work in progress play out is at the Supreme Court.

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow Tuesday to nascent efforts to track the quality and cost of health care, ruling that a 1974 law precludes states from requiring that every health care claim involving their residents be submitted to a massive database.

The arguments were arcane, but the effect is clear: We're a long way off from having a true picture of the country's health care spending, especially differences in the way hospitals treat patients and doctors practice medicine.

The United States Supreme Court opens a new term Monday, and, as always, many of the most contentious issues facing the country — including abortion, birth control coverage, public employee unions, affirmative action in higher education, voter participation — are likely to be before the court.

But there is a difference this term. Chief Justice John Roberts, despite his overall conservative record on the bench, has become a punching bag for candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination.

Ashley Lopez/Twitter

  U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is applauding a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the Obama Administration overstepped when it set limits for toxic air pollutants through an EPA rule.

McConnell spoke Monday in Louisville to local business leaders.

Author: Ludovic Bertron, via Wikimedia Commons

  Update 12:40 p.m.: Beshear’s Full Statement

Here’s Beshear’s full statement:

“The fractured laws across the country concerning same-sex marriage had created an unsustainable and unbalanced legal environment, wherein citizens were treated differently depending on the state in which they resided. That situation was unfair, no matter which side of the debate you may support.

Ashley Lopez/WFPL

  Kentucky’s case before the Supreme Court started with a conversation between attorneys Shannon Fauver and Dawn Elliott.

As they chatted in Fauver’s Louisville office, the U.S. Supreme Court was considering a challenge to the federal Defense of Marriage Act, a piece of legislation that was an obstacle to same-sex marriage being made legal in the U.S.

The Affordable Care Act is once again before the Supreme Court.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is asking the U.S. Supreme Court for more time to decide whether to appeal a lower court's order saying citizens should be allowed to publicly carry concealed guns.

Madigan already got one extension — until June 24 — to challenge the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that said a ban on concealed firearms is unconstitutional. Now she wants until July 24.

Madigan filed the request late Friday.

Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court says it won’t hear an Illinois appeal on new legislative districts, giving no reason for its refusal.  The state’s G.O.P lawmakers say they’re disappointed.  Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno  and House Minority Leader Tom Cross allege the maps were gerrymandered to benefit Democrats and say the redistricting was unconstitutional. Lower courts have so far thrown out their complaints.

LRC Public Information

Congressman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., believes the U.S. Supreme Court will uphold the Affordable Care Act.

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