U.S. Supreme Court

Brandon Bourdages, 123rf Stock Photo

The refusal by U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell and other Republican leaders in the chamber to conduct hearings on President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court was the focus of this month’s Louisville Forum discussion. 

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Illinois Senator Mark Kirk has become the first Republican senator to break with party leaders and call for a vote on President Barack Obama's Supreme Court pick. Kirk said Friday on Chicago radio station WLS that the Senate should "man up and cast a vote."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell vowed again Wednesday to block President Obama's Supreme Court nomination, saying the American people should have a "voice" in the process.

President Obama's choice to serve as the newest Supreme Court justice is Merrick Garland, a moderate federal appeals court judge and former prosecutor with a reputation for collegiality and meticulous legal reasoning.

Garland, who has won past Republican support, has "more federal judicial experience than any other Supreme Court nominee in history," a White House official said. "No one is better suited to immediately serve on the Supreme Court."

Underlying the debate over Apple's refusal to help the FBI unlock the iPhone of San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook is the idea that cellphones hold the most intimate details of our daily lives. That wasn't always so obvious. As the role of technology changes, so have our attitudes, and one of the places to see this work in progress play out is at the Supreme Court.

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow Tuesday to nascent efforts to track the quality and cost of health care, ruling that a 1974 law precludes states from requiring that every health care claim involving their residents be submitted to a massive database.

The arguments were arcane, but the effect is clear: We're a long way off from having a true picture of the country's health care spending, especially differences in the way hospitals treat patients and doctors practice medicine.

The United States Supreme Court opens a new term Monday, and, as always, many of the most contentious issues facing the country — including abortion, birth control coverage, public employee unions, affirmative action in higher education, voter participation — are likely to be before the court.

But there is a difference this term. Chief Justice John Roberts, despite his overall conservative record on the bench, has become a punching bag for candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination.

Ashley Lopez/Twitter

  U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is applauding a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the Obama Administration overstepped when it set limits for toxic air pollutants through an EPA rule.

McConnell spoke Monday in Louisville to local business leaders.

Author: Ludovic Bertron, via Wikimedia Commons

  Update 12:40 p.m.: Beshear’s Full Statement

Here’s Beshear’s full statement:

“The fractured laws across the country concerning same-sex marriage had created an unsustainable and unbalanced legal environment, wherein citizens were treated differently depending on the state in which they resided. That situation was unfair, no matter which side of the debate you may support.

Ashley Lopez/WFPL

  Kentucky’s case before the Supreme Court started with a conversation between attorneys Shannon Fauver and Dawn Elliott.

As they chatted in Fauver’s Louisville office, the U.S. Supreme Court was considering a challenge to the federal Defense of Marriage Act, a piece of legislation that was an obstacle to same-sex marriage being made legal in the U.S.

Pages