U. S. Army

National Security
9:32 am
Fri April 11, 2014

What's The Right Size For The U.S. Army?

As the U.S. winds down the Afghan war, the government is eyeing a much reduced military force — to its lowest level since World War II. Here, soldiers from the U.S. Army's 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, salute during the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" during a homecoming ceremony Feb. 27 in Fort Knox, Ky.
Luke Sharrett Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:14 pm

With the U.S. military out of Iraq and winding down in Afghanistan, the U.S. Army, which peaked with a force of around 570,000 a few years ago, was supposed to drop to around 490,000 troops.

But U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that's still too big.

"An Army of this size is larger than required to meet the demands of our defense strategy," Hagel told a news conference in February.

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Education
2:34 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Army Shutters UT Martin ROTC and 12 Other Programs; Aims To Change Demographics

Credit U.S. Army Media

The Army is ending 13 officer training programs nationwide, including the ROTC program at the University of Tennessee at Martin. 

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Government
12:22 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Army Announces Forced Reductions At Ft. Knox, Ft. Campbell Untouched

Credit Fort Campbell photo

The head Kentucky’s Commission on Military Affairs said the Army’s recently announced force reductions represent a good news, bad news scenario for the Commonwealth. 

Colonel David Thompson testified in Frankfort Thursday before the Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection Committee.  He said the good news is that Fort Campbell is relatively unscathed by the cuts.

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Society
11:34 am
Wed November 21, 2012

Clarksville Community Reaches Out to Soldiers, Veterans, Families

Credit phc.amedd.army.mil

A Clarksville, Tenn., pastor says communities need to do more to reach out to soldiers and their families affected by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and suicide.

Steve Estep is senior pastor of Grace Church of the Nazarene. He’s part of a movement to get more community members to recognize combat stress and soldiers at risk for suicide.

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