U. S. Army

For the first time, top Army and Marine Corps leaders have testified that they think women should register for the draft.

"I think that all eligible and qualified men and women should register for the draft," Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley said during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Both Milley and Marine Gen. Robert Neller said women, like men, should be required to register for the Selective Service at age 18.

It's a recent morning out in California's Mojave Desert, and Marine Lance Cpls. Paula Pineda and Julia Carroll are struggling to pick up and maneuver Carl. He's a 220-pound dummy, and a stand-in for a wounded Marine.

Carroll's knees buckle for a moment, but as a dusty wind picks up, the two women pull Carl off their light armored vehicle. They carry him to safety, careful not to let his head drag on the rocky ground.

Both women are out of breath.

Pineda is 5 foot 2. On the back of her helmet is a piece of masking tape with the words "Mad Max."

With the U.S. military out of Iraq and winding down in Afghanistan, the U.S. Army, which peaked with a force of around 570,000 a few years ago, was supposed to drop to around 490,000 troops.

But U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that's still too big.

"An Army of this size is larger than required to meet the demands of our defense strategy," Hagel told a news conference in February.

U.S. Army Media

The Army is ending 13 officer training programs nationwide, including the ROTC program at the University of Tennessee at Martin. 

Fort Campbell photo

The head Kentucky’s Commission on Military Affairs said the Army’s recently announced force reductions represent a good news, bad news scenario for the Commonwealth. 

Colonel David Thompson testified in Frankfort Thursday before the Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection Committee.  He said the good news is that Fort Campbell is relatively unscathed by the cuts.


A Clarksville, Tenn., pastor says communities need to do more to reach out to soldiers and their families affected by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and suicide.

Steve Estep is senior pastor of Grace Church of the Nazarene. He’s part of a movement to get more community members to recognize combat stress and soldiers at risk for suicide.