Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

The use of big data is revolutionizing big agriculture: detailed information guides farmers through business transactions, planting schedules, fertilizer applications and far more. This data harvest promises greater profit and greener production techniques. But as Nicole Erwin reports, some thorny questions are cropping up about just who owns the farming data.

The clock is ticking for Destiny Davis and Jamya Whitmore.

The two high school freshmen, along with 40 of their classmates, are about to give up their cellphones for 24 hours.

They clutch them as they get mentally prepared. Davis says the good part will be talking to her family more.

The bad part? Kinda the same — "Because we're always communicating on our phones. Like, your family could be in the next room, and we texting them, but now you've got to get up and walk to go get them!"

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation via Facebook

  A public policy think tank has released a report that says Kentucky could save around $170 million over the next five years by going electronic with some of its operations.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Murray State University 'Test Drive a Racer' internship program is in its second year and has been met with "glowing" praise from employers says Dr. Steve Cobb, Dean of the Jones College of Science, Engineering & Technology. He stops by Sounds Good to speak with Tracy Ross about how the program helps get students in the door at companies and government institutions where it might otherwise be difficult; they also discuss construction on campus, a career day later this week and opportunities for study abroad.

Commentary: The Roots of Technology

Aug 21, 2014

Madisonville author Patricia Wiles returns as a WKMS commentator after a hiatus of many years. She reflects on "The Roots of Technology" and how, while 'graying gracefully' she and her husband have bonded over their iPhones.

Cindy Ragland  is coordinating the West Kentucky Forum of the Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative, coming up Thursday, November 14th, to interest girls 3rd grade and older in science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the Collaborative and the event. 

You're probably well-acquainted with one of life's little annoyances: the password.

Your voicemail. Your email. Your smartphone. Maybe you've got a different one for each — which means you're bound to slip up.

Or maybe you use the same one for everything — a security no-no. The number of sites and services that demand a password or PIN seems to have grown exponentially. And keeping track of the ones you've got? Forget about it.

One of the agencies contracted to clean up the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is donating used computer equipment to a local technical school.

DUF6, a uranium cleanup project of Babcock and Wilcox Conversion Services, transferred 223 computers and printers to the Fulton County Area Technical Center in Hickman late last month.

Principal Tom Pyron said the center, which provides technology and trade education for area high school students, was under budget pressure that the donation relieves.

Wikimedia Commons

From NPR: We've been looking at how technology has totally changed what it means to watch television or a movie. One of the biggest changes has been in demand — people want a baseball game — on their smartphone, wherever they are, right now.

Wikimedia Commons

Tennessee has been named as one of the top states in the nation for its efficient use of digital technology in state government. Governor Bill Haslam says the state was among six to receive an A-minus in the 2012 Digital States Survey. The survey is one of the longest running examinations of technology use in state government. Tennessee had scored a B-plus in 2010. This year only Michigan and Utah scored an A. The states are graded on savings or benefits from the use of technology, progress over the last two years, innovation and effective collaboration.