slavery

kchr.ky.gov

  The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights’ governing board wants to see a change to a section of the state constitution that allows slavery as criminal punishment.

Trahern Gallery's First Fall Exhibit Personifies Slaveship Misery

Aug 19, 2015
Austin Peay State University Department of Art and Design Trahern Exhibition Schedule

Fifteen concrete figures of men, women and children augment a dark time in history through the powerfully crafted visual narrative of sculptor Stephen Hayes' Cash Crop, the first of this season's exhibits coming to Austin Peay University's Trahern Gallery.  Gallery Director Michael Dickens speaks with Kate on Sounds Good  about the lineup this season and the opening exhibit Cash Crop

On this June day in 1865, the last Confederate general surrendered to the Unionists, and the bloodiest war in the nation's history officially came to an end. It was a war in which food played a powerful role in determining the outcome.

Cookbooks published during the Civil War era provide vivid, contrasting portraits of how the conflict affected diets and social lives in the North and the South. A house divided against itself, indeed: There was very little in common between the kitchens of the Yankee North and the Confederate South.

Kentucky Historical Society

When was the last time you hand wrote a letter? For most people, not recently. In the 19th century, letters were vital links to family and friends. And for historians today, they are a snapshot of daily life. The Kentucky Historical Society recently added 27 letters to its collection. Called the Watson and Robinson letters, they contain information about the lives of free and enslaved families in Hopkinsville and Lexington. Louise Jones is the director of Special Collections and the Martin F. Schmidt Research Library. Jones spoke with Angela Hatton about the significance of the Watson and Robinson collection.

Albert Mohler.com

The Southern Baptist Convention is undergoing a name change. Congregations may soon have the option to call themselves either Southern Baptists or Great Commission Baptists. President of Louisville’s Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Albert Mohler was a member of the church review committee that voted for the new name. He says a major reason for the change is the history behind the name. He says in an interview with WFPL in Louisville,