sexual harassment

Minnesota Democratic Sen. Al Franken is facing a second allegation that he groped a woman without consent while her husband took a photo of her with the senator at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010.

Franken "pulled me in really close, like awkward close, and as my husband took the picture, he put his hand full-fledged on my rear," said Lindsay Menz, who told her story to CNN. "It wasn't around my waist. It wasn't around my hip or side. It was definitely on my butt," she said.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

President Trump lashed out on Twitter on Thursday night against Sen. Al Franken, who has been accused by a Los Angeles radio host of sexually assaulting her. Leeann Tweeden, a former model, was on a USO tour with Franken in 2006, before he was a senator, when the incident occurred. She also produced a photo of Franken posed with his hands on her chest as she slept.

As NPR's Board of Directors meet in Washington, D.C., this week, the network finds itself confronted by a series of dispiriting developments: a CEO on medical leave; a chief news executive forced out over sexual harassment allegations; the sudden resignation of a board chairman; fresh complaints over inappropriate behavior by colleagues; and a network roiled by tensions over the treatment of its female workers.

Updated at 4:05 p.m. ET

Another prominent public figure has been accused of making unwanted sexual advances. Los Angeles radio host Leeann Tweeden said now-Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., forced himself on her and groped her while the two were on a USO tour in 2006.

As more alleged victims of sexual harassment have come forward in recent weeks, it's clear that they've found strength in numbers.

But workers' rights advocates fear that cases before the Supreme Court could end up limiting employees' abilities to bring collective action on harassment and other issues in the workplace.

Anne Kitzman, 123rf stock photo

A Democratic lawmaker in Kentucky said he has asked a state ethics commission to investigate a sexual harassment settlement involving four members of the state House.

The growing list of sexual harassment allegations against high-profile men across industries, including Hollywood and the media, has prompted a fundamental shift in the landscape of such allegations and how lawyers on both sides are handling these cases.

In the weeks since accusations against Hollywood executive Harvey Weinstein surfaced, other allegations have been lobbed at several prominent men, including actor Kevin Spacey, comedian Louis C.K. and film director Brett Ratner.

On Oct. 5, The New York Times published an article detailing alleged sexual misconduct by film executive Harvey Weinstein that dated back nearly three decades.

The article featured evidence and interviews describing a pattern in which the film producer would invite young women to a business meeting, sometimes in his hotel room, and then sexually assault or harass them.

Two female lawmakers accused sitting members of Congress of sexual harassment but did not divulge their identities, at a House hearing Tuesday.

"This is about a member who is here now; I don't know who it is. But somebody who I trust told me the situation," said Rep. Barbara Comstock, R-Va., a member of the House Administration Committee, which is conducting a review of existing policies to prevent and report sexual harassment.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET: Thursday evening the Senate approved a resolution mandating sexual harassment prevention training for all employees of the Senate, including senators.

Usually it takes a scandal that rocks the Capitol to change the way it runs, but this time lawmakers aren't waiting for one before they beginning taking steps to enhance safeguards against sexual harassment in Congress.

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