September 11

Kentuckians joined the rest of the nation and the world last weekend in marking the 15th anniversary of the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil.  There were interfaith services, a memorial dedication, and a 9/11 stair climb.

Two Central Kentucky Muslims hold out hope for growing relationships in the next 15 years.

The names of each of the nearly 3,000 victims of the Sept. 11 attacks were read at a ceremony at the Sept. 11 memorial plaza, at the World Trade Center site in New York City. This marks the 15th anniversary of the attacks.

Family members came forward to name and honor their relatives who died at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and on Flight 93. The event also commemorated the victims of the 1993 World Trade Center bombings.

In the quarter-century from the end of the Vietnam War in the 1970s until Sept. 11, 2001, the United States rarely went to war, and when it did, the conflicts were so brief they were measured in days.

It was just after 8:45 a.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, when the first jet struck the World Trade Center in New York City and the worst terrorist attack in the nation's history began. Nearly 3,000 people died.

At that time this morning, many Americans paused for a moment of silence. President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama were among them.

McConnell, Whitfield Remark on 9/11 Anniversary

Sep 11, 2012
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Kentucky's Washington D. C. legislators made statements today in commemoration of the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell delivered the following remarks at the Congressional 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony at the U.S. Capitol:

“More than a decade later, most of us still remember 9/11 like it was yesterday: the initial confusion, the horrifying realization of what was happening, the watching, the waiting, the grief, the anger, the resolve.