Segregation

African-Americans experience a significant drop in their blood pressure after they move out of highly segregated neighborhoods and into more integrated neighborhoods, researchers report Monday.

A study involving more than 2,000 African-Americans found that those who moved from the most-segregated neighborhoods to less-segregated neighborhoods later experienced lower systolic blood pressure, a factor in heart attacks and strokes.

There's a compelling question at the heart of a report released this week by the Metropolitan Planning Council: If more people — especially educated professional white Americans — knew exactly how they are harmed by the country's pervasive racial segregation, would they be moved to try to decrease it?

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

Some Louisvillians are concerned that legislation moving through the General Assembly to allow students to attend the public school closest to their homes rather than their assigned school district would re-segregate the public education system in the city.

kchr.ky.gov / Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

This week marks the 50th anniversary of a Kentucky event of importance not only for the state, but also for the nation. On March 5, 1964, over 10,000 people marched to Frankfort, Kentucky, led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Jackie Robinson, demanding a law to end segregation in the Commonwealth. We hear the story with Kate Lochte, through the voices of a state employee of that time and an organizer of the event - who is still working for human rights.