science

ctj71081 / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

  Take a shot of bourbon.

Likely, you’ll feel an immediate burn in your mouth and throat. Give it a few seconds. Your body temperature starts to rise. Your cheeks flush.

If you take another drink, there might be some dizziness, too.

There are effects of drinking alcohol that you can feel pretty much immediately. But there’s an entire field of study that takes a harder look at the effects of alcohol under the surface — specifically when it comes to the bacteria in our guts.

via March for Science Bowling Green, KY, Facebook

Bowling Green organizers are planning a local March for Science in support of the national event on April 22, which is Earth Day.

Bryan Jones / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

The Universities of Kentucky and Louisville are joining together to create a national center of excellence in micro and nanotechnology.   

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Murray State University 'Test Drive a Racer' internship program is in its second year and has been met with "glowing" praise from employers says Dr. Steve Cobb, Dean of the Jones College of Science, Engineering & Technology. He stops by Sounds Good to speak with Tracy Ross about how the program helps get students in the door at companies and government institutions where it might otherwise be difficult; they also discuss construction on campus, a career day later this week and opportunities for study abroad.

NASA/Apollo 17 crew; taken by either Harrison Schmitt or Ron Evans / National Aeronautics and Space Administration

"Where did we come from?" is one of the biggest questions we wrestle with.  Some will say the answers lie only in science; others will say religion is the sole source of truth.  And some from both sides say the two sides are irreconcilable.  But are they?  Two Murray State University professors are giving a presentation tonight that asserts that, far from conflicting, science and religion are in harmony when it comes to where our planet and all its life came from.  Todd Hatton speaks with Dr. Josh Ridley of Murray State's Institute of Engineering and Dr.

science.energy.gov

"Which of the following organelles would be most abundant in cells that are producing large amounts of ATP through oxidative metabolism?" If you were a middle school student participating in the National Science Bowl, then you'd know the answer is probably... mitochondria? On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Jan Tyler, National Science Bowl Coordinator of the Department of Energy's Office of Science to learn more about the West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl, for which high school teams have until February 11 to register - and there are a few openings for middle school teams, whose competition is February 6.

Scientists — and anyone who lives with a canine — know that dogs pay close attention to the emotion in our voices. They listen for whether our tone is friendly or mean, how the pitch goes up or down and even the rhythms in our speech.

But what about the meaning of the words we say?

Sure, a few studies have reported on supersmart dogs that know hundreds of words. Chaser, a border collie in South Carolina, even learned 1,022 nouns and commands to go with them.

As you may be aware, there's a hot new space movie now in theaters — Interstellar. Here's the premise: It's just a little bit in the future, conditions have become pretty horrible on Earth and some astronauts head out in search of a new planet for humans to inhabit.

Until about 600 million years ago, seeing colors didn't matter so much to Earth's inhabitants — nobody had eyes.

"Before the eye evolved, you just wouldn't have seen what was there," says Andrew Parker, a biologist at London's Natural History Museum who studies the evolution of color.

kygirlsstem.com

Cindy Ragland  is coordinating the West Kentucky Forum of the Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative, coming up Thursday, November 14th, to interest girls 3rd grade and older in science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the Collaborative and the event. 

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