racial discrimination

What does it mean to declare that #blacklivesmatter in education?

Last month the Movement for Black Lives, representing elements of the Black Lives Matter movement and related groups, issued a detailed policy platform denouncing what it called "corporate-backed," "market driven" "privatization" in school reform, and helped set off a furor over this question.

The city of San Francisco is in a quandary. Like many big cities, it faces an affordability crisis, and city leaders are looking for a way to build housing to help low- and middle-income residents stay there.

But one proposal to give current residents of a historically African-American neighborhood help to do that has run afoul of the Obama administration.

Consider the case of Mack Watson. At 96, he is a vision of elegance in his freshly pressed ribbon collar shirt, vest and sports coat. He has called San Francisco home since 1947.


An African-American student at Western Kentucky University says a recent act of vandalism has made her become more aware of her surroundings. 

Cheyenne Mitchell’s car was keyed with a racial slur this week while parked on campus.

rido, 123rf Stock Photo

  Multiracial people in Kentucky are 30 percent more likely to have asthma, according to a new report from the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and the University of Kentucky released on Tuesday.

When the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau looked into the Mississippi-based regional bank BancorpSouth, it didn't just review thousands of loan applications. It sent in undercover operatives — some white, some black — who pretended to be customers applying for loans.

"They had similar credit scores and similar background and situations," says CFPB Director Richard Cordray. "Our investigation had found that BancorpSouth had engaged in illegal redlining in Memphis, meaning refusing to lend into specific areas of the city."

Murray State University 1961 Shield Yearbook, Courtesy of Wesley Bolin at Pogue Library

A group of six college students walked from Murray State University across the street to a small restaurant, about to quietly protest its “white-only” policy. Entering the establishment, the five white boys from New York ordered meals for the group. When the food was ready, Nancy Tyler Demartra, the first African American to attend MSU full-time and eventually graduate, stood up to pay. When the cashiers refused her money, the entire group said “no, thanks,” and walked out. It took about three months of visits like these, but with the help of others on campus the group finally pushed the restaurant to adopt an “open” serving policy. That was 1961. Fifty-four years later, Nancy speaks with Kate on Sounds Good about her experiences at MSU and her accomplishments in the Human and Civil Rights arenas.

Niaz Khadem

The Paducah Racial Unity Group held several showings of the film Racial Taboo at Maiden Alley Cinema over the past month, to a strong and diverse attendance. Group organizers Beth Khadem and Lincoln Heights Missionary Baptist Church pastor Reverend Alfred Anderson visit Sounds Good to discuss the next steps in a six-part series of workshops called "Continuing the Conversation," which start tonight.


The late Connie Donley's family and friends in Paducah continue her passionate interest in race unity with a roll-out of many events in coming weeks, all intended to get black and white people talking about race together. They found a project for a perfect opener. Brian Grimm, director of the film Racial Taboo, visits Paducah, dines with the Race Unity Group tonight, speaks with the Paducah Sun and helps with the first four showings of his creation set for this weekend at Maiden Alley Cinema. Kate Lochte speaks with Grimm on Sounds Good.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University begins Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemorative events early with a candlelight vigil and march Sunday evening, with community breakfasts Saturday in Paducah and Monday in Murray. A series of presentations follow, including the screening of Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom by Cinema International. MSU Multi-Cultural Affairs Director S.G. Carthell and Cinema International Coordinator Tim Johns join Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about MLK Day and diversity events this semester.


After a lengthy investigation, the Christian County Board of Education is currently taking steps to comply with recommendations to correct racial discrimination in Christian County Public Schools' discipline application.