The rumor mill is on.

A report by an Israeli newspaper, citing anonymous industry sources, pointed the finger at an Israeli company as the firm helping the FBI get inside the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters.

The Federal Communications Commission is proposing, for the first time, privacy regulations for Internet service providers. The goal is to let consumers weigh in on what information about them gets collected and how it's used.

As they connect us to the Internet, ISPs have insight into our lives — websites we frequent, apps we download or locations we visit — and may use that data for their own promotions or sell it to data brokers to be used for marketing or other purposes.

Shawn Hempel, 123rf Stock Photo

Police would collect DNA samples from Kentuckians arrested for felony crimes under legislation that passed a Senate committee Thursday. The DNA samples would then be sent to the Kentucky State Police crime lab, where they would be uploaded to an FBI database. 

Underlying the debate over Apple's refusal to help the FBI unlock the iPhone of San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook is the idea that cellphones hold the most intimate details of our daily lives. That wasn't always so obvious. As the role of technology changes, so have our attitudes, and one of the places to see this work in progress play out is at the Supreme Court.

A cybersecurity measure was one of many provisions lawmakers tucked into the massive $1.1 trillion federal spending bill that Congress approved on Friday. It's aimed at fighting the theft of data held by big companies, by allowing those companies to share information with each other and with the government. But it has privacy advocates very worried.

Collecting huge amounts of information about all of us and then using supercomputers to sift through, analyze and study it — this is a reality of modern life, and it can be a tremendously powerful thing.

Researchers can use techniques like those to identify genetic markers linked to breast cancer, better understand climate change or figure out how to combat hospital infections.

New Net Neutrality Rules Explained

Feb 24, 2014

The issue of net neutrality has seen a resurgence on across the internet again after the announcement that Netflix has agreed to pay Comcast to make its service run faster. The principle of net neutrality is that no internet service provider give favor to a particular company where, for example, the highest bidder could therefore throttle broadband connections. Murray State's Center for Telecommunications Systems Management Associate Director Michael Ramage talks about last week's FCC announcement of plans for new net neutrality rules on Sounds Good.