A stalled Paducah riverfront project is being revitalized thanks to more than a million dollars in state funds.

The Paducah City Commission is pushing discussions on how to proceed with the stalled Shultz Park renovation project.  The move comes after commissioners heard cost-reduction options at last night’s meeting.

Overbudget bids are delaying a project to develop a Paducah riverfront recreation area and dock.  

The Paducah Riverfront Development Authority accepted contractor bids this week for the second phase of renovations to Shultz Park, which involves building a gangway and transient fueling dock as well as adding new sidewalks, stairs and lighting around the park.

A $10 million bid topped the proposals and a $7.8 million dollar bid, from New Albany, Ind.-based Mac Construction and Excavating, was the lowest.  

Paducah Riverfront Group Poised to Present Plan

Apr 9, 2014
Lance Dennee


The Paducah Riverfront Development Authority board is ready to present their plans to the City Commission to construct a marina along the Ohio River.

Flickr Commons

The Paducah Riverfront Development Project breaks ground today after several years of delays. The ceremony is at 11 am in Schultz park, and will celebrate the launch of the project. The PRDP was delayed several times after endangered mussel species were found at the proposed locations. The decision to move forward comes after a recent ecological impact report came back clear for the current location. Paducah Mayor Bill Paxton said in August that construction would likely begin early next year.

Paducah Riverfront Development Authority

The Paducah Riverfront Development Authority will submit its Renaissance Area Master Plan, or RAMP, to the city commission.  The RAMP’s purpose is to facilitate improved movement between Paducah’s historic downtown, the Lowertown Arts District, and the riverfront.  Officials with the PRDA hope this will in turn make Paducah a more attractive destination for tourists as well as a greater economic resource for current residents and those yet to become residents. To find out more about RAMP and its way forward, Todd Hatton sp