Ohio County

Armstrong Energy Inc. website

A coal company that operates five mines in west Kentucky is planning to halt production at its Ohio County mine.

USER WILD ZONTAR / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

  Ohio County is boosting its economic development, but not with a big manufacturing plant or a major expansion of an existing business. On July 24 the county will mark the opening of a coworking space for entrepreneurs called The Hub.

visitohiocountyky.com

A groundbreaking has been set for the Bill Monroe Museum in west Kentucky. 

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The Kentucky Finance Cabinet is seeking proposals for a new operator for the popular Beaver Dam rest stop, which abruptly closed earlier this month. 

Ground will be broken this spring in Ohio County honoring native son and Father of Bluegrass Bill Monroe.

Toni Blay, Flickr Commons

Voters in Hartford will be the next Ohio County community to decide whether to allow alcohol sales.

The Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer reports the city's wet-dry election will be held Jan. 24. Voters must live in the city limits of Hartford.

ART SMITH, EPA

Thousands of tons of arsenic-contaminated material have been removed from a site in Ohio County.

The state dug up contaminated soil and replaced it with dirt and loose stones.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

A western Kentucky tourism official says fundraising is continuing toward the construction of a proposed museum dedicated to bluegrass music legend Bill Monroe.

The Environmental Protection Agency has discovered high levels of arsenic on a property in Ohio County.

Signs have been posted and a gate put up to keep people away from the site on Shinkle Chapel Road.  Ohio County Judge-Executive David Johnston says a former property owner initiated the probe.

"The lady who lived there became sick and her animals became sick.  She was a dog breed," Johnston tells WKU Public Radio.  "She started asking questions and reported it to the federal EPA."

While he only learned of the contamination two months ago, Johnston says the poison had been on the site since the 1940s.

"Someone brought in several drums of arsenic.  We don't know what the purpose of it was, but it was stored in a barn, which burned down seven years ago or so," Johnston adds.  "It wasn't a threat until then, but it got into a large area and killed all the trees on a few acres of land."

Soil samples revealed extremely high concentrations of the toxic element.  The poison hasn’t contaminated any water supplies. The federal EPA will be overseeing the cleanup.

Jonathunder, Wikimedia Commons

Two former Ohio county officials are alleging illegal activity by Judge Executive David Johnston. 

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