Obamacare

Alexander Korzh, 123RF Stock Photo

The new report by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office predicts that 24 million Americans would be without health insurance in the next 10 years if the current Republican proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act is approved. 

The debate over how many people would lose health insurance under the Republican health care overhaul and its impact on the budget deficit obscures one of the major and most far-reaching effects of the proposal: sweeping changes to Medicaid.

When the Congressional Budget Office on Monday announced that the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would lead to 24 million people losing insurance coverage, Tom Price cried foul.

Price, the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, said the estimate that 14 million people would lose insurance in a year, and another 10 million over the following nine years, was "virtually impossible."

A new report finds that the Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would reduce the federal deficit by $337 billion over a decade but would also leave 24 million more Americans uninsured during that same period.

Rebecca Kiger

We’ve heard the statistics on the region’s heroin crisis, and how many have fallen into addiction. But one person’s story can tell a lot about what it takes to get out. As part of an occasional series on the Affordable Care Act, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores how the law expanded substance abuse treatment for thousands, including Wendy Crites. Producers Glynis Board and Rebecca Kiger bring us the story of Crites’ struggle for sobriety, told in her own words.

Ryland Barton

Vice President Mike Pence stopped in Louisville Saturday to pitch the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

feverpitched, 123rf Stock Photo

The Tennessee Hospital Association has come out against a new congressional health care proposal that would repeal and replace the Obama health care law, saying Tennesseans could lose health coverage if the measure passes into law. 

The Republican health care overhaul working its way through the House is opposed by Democrats and by many Republican conservatives. It's none too popular with the people on the front lines of health care, either — including doctors, nurses and hospitals.

The chief medical officer of Medicaid, Dr. Andrey Ostrovsky, tweeted out his opposition on Wednesday. "Despite political messaging from others at HHS, I align with the experts ... in opposition to #AHCA," the career staffer said.

Gage Skidmore, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Vice President Mike Pence plans to visit Louisville, Kentucky, on Saturday as he tries to make the case for repealing and replacing former President Barack Obama's health care law. 

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

Retired coal miners face a one-two punch to their health benefits that could leave many of them in the lurch. A repeal of Obamacare and the expiration of miner’s health protections could make it hard for any coal retiree to get health care.

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