Net Neutrality

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A group of attorneys general for 21 states and the District of Columbia has sued to block the Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net-neutrality rules. 

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Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says he is “ready for a legal fight” to protect Kentuckians from the Federal Communications Commission's order to repeal 'Net Neutrality.'

J. Tyler Franklin via wfpl.org

If the Federal Communications Commission follows through with plans to roll back “net neutrality rules,” Kentucky will be among the states challenging that decision in a lawsuit.

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

After a brief security evacuation, U.S. telecom regulators have voted to repeal so-called net neutrality rules, which restrict the power of Internet service providers to influence loading speeds for specific websites or apps.

After weeks of heated controversy and protests, the Republican majority of the Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines on Thursday to loosen Obama-era regulations for Internet providers.

Schools across the country are nervously watching to see if the Federal Communications Commission chooses to repeal Obama-era regulations that protect an open internet, often referred to as "net neutrality."

The 2015 rules are meant to prevent internet providers, such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon, from controlling what people can watch and see on the internet. Companies can't block access to any websites or apps, and can't meddle with loading speeds.

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President Trump’s FCC chairman announced plans this year to rollback some Obama-era rules enforcing net neutrality, which has sparked fierce concerns over, essentially, who gets to control the Internet. Matt Markgraf speaks with Michael Ramage, Director of the Center for Telecommunications Systems Management at Murray State University, to unpack what is being proposed and how it might affect everyday Internet users in rural Kentucky.

Federal regulators are on track to loosen regulations of cable and telecom companies.

The Federal Communications Commission will vote Dec. 14 on a plan to undo the landmark 2015 rules that had placed Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon under the strictest-ever regulatory oversight.

The vote is expected to repeal so-called net neutrality rules, which prevent broadband companies from slowing down or blocking any sites or apps, or otherwise deciding what content gets to users faster.

The Federal Communications Commission has officially begun to undo Obama-era regulations on Internet service providers, often called net neutrality rules. The rules, passed in 2015, had placed cable and telecom companies under the strictest-ever oversight of the agency.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Net neutrality is back in the headlines after FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced his plans to present a 300-page document at a meeting later this month, which would reclassify 'broadband.' Under the current Telecommunications Act, there are multiple areas: telephone, broadcast, information. If the proposal passes, broadband would be reclassified from an information service to a telecom service. Michael Ramage, Associate Director for the Center for Telecommunications Systems Management at Murray State University, discusses the latest news, explains regulating web access as a public utility and what this might mean for consumers and communications companies on Sounds Good.

You'll find spinning wheels at the top of Netflix, Etsy, Foursquare and other top sites today, as they take part in Internet Slowdown Day. While sites won't slow down for real, participating Internet companies will be covered with the symbolic loading icons "to remind everyone what an Internet without net neutrality would look like," the organizers write on their website.

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