Net Neutrality

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Net neutrality is back in the headlines after FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced his plans to present a 300-page document at a meeting later this month, which would reclassify 'broadband.' Under the current Telecommunications Act, there are multiple areas: telephone, broadcast, information. If the proposal passes, broadband would be reclassified from an information service to a telecom service. Michael Ramage, Associate Director for the Center for Telecommunications Systems Management at Murray State University, discusses the latest news, explains regulating web access as a public utility and what this might mean for consumers and communications companies on Sounds Good.

You'll find spinning wheels at the top of Netflix, Etsy, Foursquare and other top sites today, as they take part in Internet Slowdown Day. While sites won't slow down for real, participating Internet companies will be covered with the symbolic loading icons "to remind everyone what an Internet without net neutrality would look like," the organizers write on their website.

The Federal Communications Commission announced last month that it would propose new rules. In a blog post, Chairman Tom Wheeler insists that the open Internet rules will help maintain what's called network neutrality. That is, making certain that your Internet provider doesn't give a faster connection to a service that can pay more.

The issue of net neutrality has seen a resurgence on across the internet again after the announcement that Netflix has agreed to pay Comcast to make its service run faster. The principle of net neutrality is that no internet service provider give favor to a particular company where, for example, the highest bidder could therefore throttle broadband connections. Murray State's Center for Telecommunications Systems Management Associate Director Michael RamageĀ talks about last week's FCC announcement of plans for new net neutrality rules on Sounds Good.