murder

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The defense council for a man and woman charged in the murder of a Trigg County family is scheduled to teleconference with the judge and prosecutor in the case tomorrow morning. 

A rural West Tennessee community is pushing the Justice Department to reopen a 75-year-old civil rights murder case.

Elbert Williams is believed to be the first NAACP official killed for seeking to register black voters. Yet the mysterious story of his 1940 murder is not widely known.

Clues about Williams' murder are thought to be buried with him, here in the Taylor Cemetery just outside Brownsville, Tenn.

Local attorney Jim Emison walks to a corner of the cemetery, set off by two towering oaks.

"This is the area where we believe he lies," Emison says.

sheriff.toddcounty.ky.gov

The Kentucky State Police are investigating a home invasion and murder in Todd County in which a Mennonite man was killed and his wife seriously injured.

Photos courtesy of Jim Emison

Second Update: NPR's All Things Considered reported on this  effort. Here's the link to their story: Tennessee Community Pushes To Reopen 'Civil Rights Hero' Cold Case

Update: Part two of this conversation, which aired on Sounds Good Friday, June 19, has been added to this story, along with its narrative.  

Brownsville, Tennessee is in Haywood County mid-way northeast of Memphis and southwest of Jackson. On Saturday, the Haywood High School Gymnasium is the site of a Community Memorial Service honoring civil rights activist Elbert Williams on the 75th anniversary of his death. Alamo, Tennessee lawyer Jim Emison retired in 2011 and began a quest to understand more about the death of Elbert Williams, whose murder was never solved. Williams was the first known NAACP official to be killed for his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. Jim Emison speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about what he's learned.

Additional Arrest Made in Bobo Case

Sep 19, 2014
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has arrested a Decatur County man in connection with the murder of Holly Bobo. TBI Agents say on April 13, 2011, John Dylan Adams disposed of items he knew could be used as evidence in the case. John Dylan Adams is the brother of Zachary Rye Adams, who faces Felony Murder and Aggravated Kidnapping charges in connection to Bobo’s death.

Second Arrest Made in Holly Bobo Case

Apr 30, 2014
tbi.gov

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation agents have  made a second arrest in connection to the disappearance and murder of Holly Bobo, a former University of Tennessee at Martin Nursing Student.  Bobo disappeared from her home near Decaturville, TN on the morning of April 13, 2011.

In 1922, the Graves County Sheriff was murdered in the courthouse in front of several witnesses. A few days later, his wife is appointed sheriff and begins her quest for redemption. Murray attorney Sid Easley tells this true tale in his book, A Courthouse Tragedy. Easley joins Kate Lochte in the studio during Sounds Good to describe the fateful events and reads from his book.

Christian Co. Jail / Christian Co. Jail

Nearly 20 years after two young women were shot and stabbed to death at a Kentucky massage parlor, two former police officers stand charged in connection with their deaths. 

www.amw.com

The Kentucky Supreme Court has upheld the death sentence of a Western Kentucky man who pleaded guilty in 2010 to killing three children and attacking their mother near Fort Campbell. 

The conviction and 50-year prison sentence of a Kentucky teenager has been overturned after the Kentucky Supreme Court concluded his confession was coerced. The high court today ordered a new trial for 19-year-old Garrett Thomas Dye. A jury convicted Dye in 2011 of beating his adopted sister to death.

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