lobbying

Sergey Kuzmin, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky's 2018 legislative session set a record with $10.67 million spent on lobbying.

Sergey Kuzmin-123rf stock photo

  On the heels of a record year for lobbyist spending, Kentucky businesses and organizations spent an all-time high of $2.6 million in the first portion of the current legislative session.

Stu Johnson, WEKU

Kentuckians with mental and physical disabilities filled the halls of the state Capitol and annex Wednesday. They were in Frankfort to lobby lawmakers for social service funding.

Alexey Stiop/123rf Stock Photo

Although the Kentucky General Assembly met for only five days in January, lobbyist spending broke a record for the first month of an odd-year session. 

Kittugwiki, Wikimedia Commons

With the first three months of lobbyist reports in for this year’s legislative session, it looks like total spending will easily surpass the previous record.

According to the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission, business, organizations and legislative agents spent $7.5 million lobbying lawmakers in the first quarter of this year.

Legislative Research Commission

Drug companies and drug industry groups, flush with money to spend on lobbyists, are flocking to Frankfort like never before.

In just four years, the number of registered lobbyists hired by pharmaceuticals employers has nearly doubled, from 46 in 2011 to 83 today. Their annual spending has more than doubled, to $824,196 in 2015.

lrc.state.ky.us

The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce spent the most cash lobbying in the General Assembly in the month of January.

According to the Legislative Ethics Commission groups spent nearly $1.8 million that month.

USW Local 7-669

Metropolis Honeywell union members demonstrated in front of Honeywell corporate headquarters in Washington, D.C. and attempted to meet with several lobbying firms Thursday. United Steelworkers Local 7-669, joined by D.C.  AFL-CIO members delivered letters to Akin Gump, OB C Group, McBee Strategic, and Duberstein Group, who they claim Honeywell has hired along with their own in-house lobby team.

For more than a decade, U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Kentucky,  owned a $200,000-piece of West Virginia property with a lobbyist whose clients and employers had business before him in Congress, writes R.G. Dunlop, a reporter from WFPL's Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting.

Lobbyists spent $8.7 million to lobby Kentucky lawmakers this year—and tobacco giant Altria led the pack at $156,000, according to records released by the Legislative Ethics Commission this week.

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