Kentucky Writers

Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center, courtesy of Carrie Jerrell, Murray State University

Louisville Poet Adam Day reads from his poetry tonight in the Clara M. Eagle Gallery on Murray State's Campus. He speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good ahead of his visit about his inspiration, acclaim and thoughts on the succinctness of poetry.


A new lineup up of inductees will join the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame pantheon this month. And 2016’s list branches out to include the hall’s first songwriter.

Typically reserved for prose and poetry authors, the Hall of Fame is actually open to writers of all stripes – and this year voters headed by the Kentucky Arts Council approved the addition of Appalachian folk singer and songwriter Jean Ritchie, who passed away last June.

Jenni Todd, WKMS

Murray author Constance Alexander holds a reading this Sunday at 2 p.m. at Calloway County Public Library, titled "Old, New, Borrowed & Blue" featuring a variety of work, including new material on her recent project with the elderly and caregiving and her book of poetry "64 Blue Letters," about a high school yearbook in the year 1964. Alexander stops by Sounds Good to preview some of her work ahead of the reading.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

'Have a good summer! Love ya! Stay as sweet as you are! Don't ever change!' These are some of the messages that have appeared in high school yearbooks for decades. While much has changed since 1964, much of the fundamental high school experience are more or less the same. Playwright, author, teacher, former business executive Constance Alexander joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to read from her book of poems 64 Blue Letters, recalling a high school yearbook in verse.

Courtesy of Jennifer Brown, Kentucky New Era archives

Ted Poston was born in Hopkinsville in 1906. He attended an African American high school in Hopkinsville and earned his bachelor's degree in Nashville. In 1928, he moved to New York and joined the Harlem Renaissance. There, he became the first African American writer on staff at the New York Post and the first to make a career at a white mainstream paper, where he covered the major events of the Civil Rights Era. Kentucky New Era Opinion Editor Jennifer Brown joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to preview her "Ted Talk" coming up in March, with more about Hopkinsville's own, the "Dean of Black Journalists," Ted Poston.

Murray State University Professor of English Carrie Jerrell has received an Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council. She is one of six writers chosen for demonstrating a high level of excellence and creativity in their literary ares careers. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Jerrell, reading form her newest work. 

Dan Gediman is the editor of This I Believe: Kentucky and a long-time public radio producer. His work has been featured on This American Life, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Jazz Profiles. He gives Kate Lochte an overview of the radio series being developed around this book and the segments that may soon air on WKMS.