Kentucky History

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

A little over two weeks ago, we spoke with two professors of Murray State's history department who were among the 72 Kentucky history professors who signed a letter calling for the removal of the statue of Confederate president and Kentucky native Jefferson Davis from the capitol rotunda in Frankfort. The letter went to Governor Steve Beshear and to the Kentucky Historical Properties Advisory Commission, which earlier this August voted 7-2 to keep the statue where it is. But that doesn't mean the debate is over. On Sounds Good, Todd Hatton speaks with Dr. Tom Hiter, former Director of Heritage Defense for the Sons of Confederate Veterans and longtime SCV member Dr. Don Duncan.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

American pioneer and frontiersman Daniel Boone is considered one of the founding fathers of white settlement in Kentucky and though it can be a challenge to find relevance to Boone to the far western part of Kentucky - since there's no evidence he personally spent time in the region, one could argue a connection through his daughter, says Murray State history professor Ted Franklin Belue. He's done significant research on Boone, including consulting with the History Channel and serving on the board of the Filson Historical Society. Todd Hatton speaks with Belue about Boone and his legacy in the Commonwealth.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Seventy-two history professors in Kentucky have signed a letter to the Historic Properties Advisory Commission of Kentucky calling for the removal of the statue of the controversial Jefferson Davis in the capitol rotunda in Frankfort to a museum. Todd Hatton speaks with two history professors at Murray State University who signed the letter, Dr. Duane Bolin and Dr. David Pizzo who argue for a contextual understanding of Davis and explain Kentucky's distinct position as a state on both sides of the Civil War.

The keynote speaker at this year's MSU History Department James Hammack Banquet, Dr. Anne Marshall, teaches history at Mississippi State University with degrees from the University of Georgia.  And yet, she is the author of "Creating a Confederate Kentucky," a book about one of the Commonwealth's most transformational eras.  It may be hard to imagine here in the western part of the state, but Kentucky never seceded from the U.S., and it provided around 90% of its military age men to the Union cause.  But after 1865, Kentucky gave itself a rebel rebranding.  Todd Hatton speaks with Dr. Anne Marshall to get a preview of her talk and some insight into just why the Commonwealth got its Confederate makeover. 

Murray State's Department of History's distinguished Hammack Scholarship Banquet is September 14th in the University's Curris Center Ballroom. Reservations are due tomorrow! History professor Duane Bolin gives the keynote titled, "The Woman who Helped Blind Children See: Linda Neville and the Struggle to Eliminate Blindness in Kentucky." It's not surprising that fourth graders led Bolin to learn more about this early 20th century pioneer in the Commonwealth. We hear a bit of Neville's story with Dr. Bolin and Kate Lochte.

A Book of Homeplace History and Recipes

Feb 4, 2013

Paducah resident Gerry Marshall has a degree in zoology from the University of Kentucky.  She’s published a number of books, as well as over 100 articles, stories and poems for both children and adults.  Her most recent work involves LBL’s Homeplace 1850 and documents recipes from the mid 19th century that have not been well-documented to date. The Homeplace History and Receipt Book:  History, Folklore, and Recipes from Life on an Upper Southern Farm a Decade before The Civil War is available at

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