James Comer

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Agriculture Commissioner James Comer on Tuesday flatly denied published allegations that he abused a woman he dated in the early 1990s.

The Courier-Journal article, published Monday evening, included excerpts from a four-page letter written by a woman who alleged that Comer mentally and physically abused her while they were in a relationship at Western Kentucky University. The woman also alleged that Comer took her to a Louisville abortion clinic in 1991.

Less than a month shy of the primary election, three of Kentucky’s four Republican gubernatorial candidates debated Tuesday night in Bowling Green. 

The event at WKU featured Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, and former Louisville Metro Councilman Hal Heiner. 

If elected, all three pledged to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange known as Kynect. 

Comer said the state took on a lot of responsibility that it can’t afford.

"Eighty-two percent of the people who got on Kynect ended up on Medicaid," Comer explained.  "What Kynect became for Governor Beshear was a way to greatly expand Medicaid to the point to where we have 25 percent of the state on Medicaid, one out of four people.  That's not sustainable."

As governor, Comer said he would get more Kentuckians into private health coverage while changing eligibility requirements for Medicaid. 

Matt Bevin said he would transition those who signed up on Kentucky’s exchange to the federal exchange.

"Frankly, it's a level of redundancy we can't afford.  It's as simple as that," Bevin suggested.  "We were lured into participation through the use of federal dollars."

Starting in 2017, the state must begin bearing a share of the cost of expanding Medicaid.  Currently, the federal government is picking up the entire tab.

Hal Heiner suggested tying the Medicaid expansion to workforce training so people could get a job, get off of Medicaid, and obtain private insurance.  He criticized the Medicaid expansion for lacking any level of personal responsibility.

"It doesn't have what you're seeing conservative governors in other states adopt in their plans which build in incentives to use preventive care, to use primary care providers rather than emergency care, and to make healthy lifestyle choices to reduce the overall cost," Heiner stated. 

The candidates were mostly in agreement on range of economic topics from making Kentucky a right-to-work state to protecting the coal industry. 

The other GOP gubernatorial candidate, Will T. Scott did not attend the debate, citing a scheduling conflict.

James Comer/Facebook

  Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and his running mate, state Sen. Chris McDaniel, went on a flying tour across the state Monday to meet with supporters of their bid for office.

mccrackengop.com

Three of the four Republican gubernatorial candidates converged in Paducah Friday night to court votes at the McCracken County Republican Party’s Reagan Dinner, held at the Carson Center.

Gage Skidmore, Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Republican candidates for Kentucky governor say presumptive Democratic nominee Jack Conway isn’t fit to serve because he would not fight a challenge to the state’s same sex marriage ban.

Maitree Laipitaksin, 123rf Stock Photo

Leading candidates for the Republican nomination in this year’s gubernatorial race say they all want to make Kentucky’s business climate more like the one in Texas. 

During speeches last week, candidates Matt Bevin, James Comer, Hall Heiner and Will T. Scott all promised to carry out plans aimed at reducing state taxes and regulations on businesses. 
They also said they are hoping to model the Commonwealth after Texas, which has been leading the nation for economic growth. 

WKMS/John Null

Republican gubernatorial candidate James Comer says passing a statewide right-to-work law would be his first priority if elected as Kentucky's next governor.

Comer, Kentucky’s agriculture commissioner,  predicts the issue will be hotly debated during the general election, given that Democratic front-runner Jack Conway opposes such a law.

kyagr.com

Republican James Comer has officially filed to run for Kentucky governor. The first-term agriculture commissioner has been raising money since September along with his running mate, state Senator Chris McDaniel of northern Kentucky.

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As the race for the GOP gubernatorial nomination continues in Kentucky, Republican Agriculture Commissioner James Comer has picked up another endorsement.

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This Wednesday - New Year's Eve - is the deadline to switch your party affiliation for next May’s primary election in Kentucky, due to the state’s “closed” primary system.

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