India

Nikhil Gangavane, 123rf Stock Photo

You may have seen on television or movies the massive Spring festival of colors in India, known as Holi. This festival was celebrated across India last week but Murray State University's Indian Student Association brings the festival to campus this Saturday. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with the association's president Mayur Bhandare about the history and mythology of the holiday, how his family celebrates back home and the upcoming event on campus.

tamarindarts, 123rf Stock Photo

There is a big, bright festival underway in India right now: Diwali is an ancient Hindu festival of lights, celebrated each autumn. The idea is light overtaking darkness or good overcoming evil, says Mayur Bhandare, president of the Indian Student Association at Murray State University. He tells Matt Markgraf about some of the historical traditions and stories behind the festival, and how Diwali is being celebrated both back home and this weekend on the MSU campus.

Photo by Claire Dunning, for WKMS

Murray State's Indian Student Association is holding a Flash Mob today in front of the Carr Health Building on campus, featuring a mash up of diverse Indian dance and music. Matt Markgraf speaks with the association's president, international student Mayur Bhandare. They talk about how he came to Murray State, his hometown of Nashik, cultural differences between India and the United States and an Indian festival coming up next month.

Immigration Reform Could Help Kentucky Economy

Jul 4, 2014
kypolicy.org

The study, “New Americans in Kentucky,” was published this week by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. It found that immigrants make up 3 percent of the state’s population, with one-in-five immigrants to Kentucky originating from Mexico. Kentucky’s immigrant population grew faster than all but six states from 2000 to 2012.

The involvement of a state representative in a major coal deal in Kentucky is raising some eyebrows. Under the terms of a new $7 billion contract, Kentucky coal producers will ship nine million tons of coal a year to India for the next twenty-five years. Representative Keith Hall was instrumental in brokering the deal—and he represents both the people of Kentucky and his own private coal interests.

The involvement of a state representative in a major coal deal in Kentucky is raising some eyebrows.  The $7 billion contract signed yesterday creates a 25-year standing order to ship 9 million tons of Kentucky coal annually to India. Pike County Representative Keith Hall was instrumental in brokering the deal—but he also has several coal-related businesses. He also sits on the board of FJS Energy—the New Jersey-based company that signed the contract. Hall says his involvement in the deal was both as a state lawmaker and a businessman.

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Coal mines in Kentucky and West Virginia will send millions of tons of coal to India, under the terms of a 25-year contract that was signed Wednesday. As Kentucky Public Radio’s Erica Peterson reports, the deal is being hailed as a sign of hope in the coal export market.

Behind the Beautiful Forevers is the kind of book journalists dream of writing. Katherine Boo spent approximately four years with the people of the Annawadi slums in Mumbai in order to craft her expose on Indian poverty. The book reads like a novel. Though she witnessed most of the book’s events herself, Boo excises herself from the story, writing in third person perspective of the people in Annawadi.