hunting

Sangsak Aeiddam/123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission has recommended extending the deer season for some hunters to 16 days, along with other changes to help thin the state's herd.

Tom Wrasse is at his hunting shack alone. Light pours into the small room from a window framed by antlers, harvested from the surrounding central Wisconsin woods. On the opposite wall is a collage of fading photos, showing how big the hunting parties out here used to be.

Would you eat venison if there was a chance it could slowly eat away at your brain?

If there's a slight possibility, it doesn't bother Patrick States. On the menu this evening for his wife and two daughters at their Northglenn, Colo., home are pan-seared venison steaks with mashed potatoes and a whiskey cream sauce.

"We each have our specialty, actually," says States as the steak sizzles. "The girls made elk tamales this morning, but we use [venison or elk] in spaghetti, chili, soup, whatever."

Hunters, fishermen and other sportsmen had high expectations when Ryan Zinke was tapped to be President Trump's interior secretary, in part because of his promise to bring a balanced, Teddy Roosevelt-style vision to managing public lands.

But the former Republican congressman from Montana is now the target of a critical ad campaign by one of those groups, a symptom of eroding support among a deep-pocketed faction that has become increasingly influential.

On the day before President Trump's inauguration, the outgoing Obama administration passed a last-minute directive banning the use of lead ammunition and fishing sinkers on federal land.

Recently, the deteriorating health of a bald eagle showed the effects of lead poisoning. Obama's regulation is intended to protect wildlife from exactly that.

But hunters are hoping Trump will soon overturn it.

Last week, an officer from the Pennsylvania Game Commission brought a bald eagle to the Carbon County Environmental Education Center in northeastern Pennsylvania.

matt knoth / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources says the number of people applying for the state’s first legal bobcat hunt was 13 times more than the number of available permits.  

Nearly 6,500 hunters applied for 500 permits.  

vladmax, 123rf Stock Photo

Public lands for hunting in Kentucky have increased by more than 4,600 acres. The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife said Wednesday they have opened six new properties, including two in western Kentucky. 

LBL to Close Some Wildlife Refuges for Winter

Oct 28, 2013
LBL Forest Service

Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area is closing nine wildlife refuges for the winter starting next month.

The refuges include portions of Duncan Bay, Smith Bay, and Rushing Bay on Kentucky Lake; Fulton and Honker bays on Lake Barkley; and Long Creek Refuge at the back of Elbow Bay.

Coyote Hunting Bill Approved by State Senate Committee

Feb 27, 2013

  Legislation that would allow Kentuckians to hunt coyotes has been approved by the Senate Natural Resources and Environment Committee. 

Hunters killed 92 sandhill cranes in Kentucky's second hunting season for the bird. That's 42 more than last season.

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