healthcare

David Brinkley, WKYU

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman says he thinks lawmakers will need to have a greater say in any future U.S. military action in Syria.

As members of Congress debate the future of the health law and its implications for consumers, how are they personally affected by the outcome? And how will the law that phases out the popular Medigap Plan F – popular supplemental Medicare insurance — affect beneficiaries? We've got answers to these and other recent questions from readers.

comer.house.gov, cropped

U.S. Congressman James Comer discussed Syria, healthcare, tax reform and thoughts about President Trump with Murray-Calloway County business leaders at a Chamber of Commerce breakfast on Tuesday morning. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

U.S. Congressman James Comer held a two-part town hall forum at the Hopkinsville Community College Monday night, having made earlier stops in Taylor and Simpson Counties. The evening began with a Kentucky Farm Bureau listening session, discussing challenges in crafting the next Farm Bill and agriculture industry representatives outlining what they want in the next legislation. A more informal event followed, answering questions from members of local groups opposing President Trump's agenda: 'Pennyroyal Indivisible' and 'Resist Kentucky.'

President Trump may have said he is ready to move on, but the House Freedom Caucus can't let health care go.

The same firebrand conservatives who helped derail the GOP's long-awaited legislation to repeal and replace key parts of the Affordable Care Act are now trying to breathe new life into the bill with a long shot effort to bring it back for a vote in May.

Would opening the door to cheaper, skimpier marketplace plans with higher deductibles and copays attract consumers and insurers to the exchanges next year? That's what the Trump administration is betting on.

In February, the administration proposed a rule that would take a bit of the shine off bronze, silver, gold and platinum exchange plans by allowing them to provide less generous coverage while keeping the same metal level designation.

For more than two decades, Celeste Thompson, 57, a home care worker in Missoula, Mont., had not had regular contact with a doctor — no annual physicals and limited sick visits. She also needed new glasses.

Like many others who work in the lower rungs of the health care system, a category that includes nursing aides as well as direct care and personal care assistants, she has worked hard to keep her clients healthy by feeding them, dressing them and helping them navigate chronic conditions.

Ryland Barton

President Donald Trump urged a crowd in Louisville to support the plan to repeal and replace Obamacare currently making it through the U.S. House of Representatives.

Official Photo, Public Domain

A rally of about 20 people this afternoon in downtown Martin, Tennessee called for Republican Representative David Kustoff to vote against repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. Attendees chanted "Medicaid for All" and "Universal Healthcare" to people driving by. 

For years, Republicans in Congress have promised to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, claiming that its requirement for nearly everyone to buy insurance or pay a fine is burdensome and costly, and it doesn't give people enough flexibility to get the coverage they need.

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