healthcare

Updated on Aug. 10 at 4 p.m. ET

President Trump is continuing to voice his frustration with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, tweeting on Thursday that the Kentucky Republican should "get back to work" after last month's failure to pass a health care alternative to the Affordable Care Act.

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Kentuckians who feel going to the doctor is too expensive — but don’t know how to shop for the lowest price — aren’t alone.

The shrinking unemployment rate has been a healthy turn of events for people with job-based insurance.

Eager to attract good help in a tight labor market — and unsure of the future of the Affordable Care Act — large employers are newly committed to maintaining health coverage for workers and often for their families, too, according to new research and interviews with business analysts.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

U.S. Congressman James Comer described the status and goals of Republican-led health care reform, 'hyper-partisanship,' tax reform and infrastructure plans on the horizon, achievements in deregulation and 'business-friendliness' and other topics at a town hall in Hickman County on Thursday. 

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

The Senate Health Care Vote, Simplified

Jul 24, 2017

The Senate is expected to vote Tuesday on whether to advance health care legislation to the Senate floor. That would open up debate on an Obamacare repeal and/or replacement plan.

The importance of the vote was highlighted by Sen. John McCain's decision to return to Washington to take part. He announced last week that he had been diagnosed with brain cancer.

When Taylor Merendo moved to Bloomington, Ind., nearly two years ago, fleeing an abusive marriage, she needed help.

"I was six months pregnant and at that point in time, I really didn't have a stable place to live," Merendo says.

Healthy Debate: What The Republican Health Bill Taught Us About Medicaid

Jul 24, 2017

As the Senate nears a vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, some Ohio Valley lawmakers and residents are increasingly uneasy with the potential effects. Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia are highly dependent on Medicaid, and proposed changes could have bigger effects here than almost anywhere else in the country. The Ohio Valley ReSource has an analysis of how the heated debate has shed light on the region’s health concerns.

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More than 14 million people got health coverage through Medicaid because of the Affordable Care Act. That was a boon for rural hospitals, who traditionally serve patients who are poor and don't have health insurance. 

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Some Kentucky and southern Indiana physicians have been charged in what U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions calls the largest health care fraud takedown in the nation’s history. 

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