federal highway trust fund

Wasin Pummarin, 123rf Stock Photo

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he'll call a special session of the General Assembly to try to fix the state's drunken driving law and save $60 million in federal highway funds.


As part of its efforts to get Congress to pass a long-term transportation bill, the U.S. Department of Transportation has released an “infrastructure snapshot” that paints a grim portrait of Kentucky’s roads and bridges.

Congressional inaction threatening the solvency of the Federal Highway Trust Fund may cost Kentucky $185 million for projects, drastically changing how the state pays for road construction, Gov. Steve Beshear said Wednesday.

Some officials are pushing for a 65 mile per hour speed limit on US 68/KY 80, but Kentucky’s transportation cabinet secretary said now isn’t the time.

Mike Hancock said he’s reluctant to change the speed limit since many tourists come to western Kentucky.

Kentucky's transportation secretary is warning lawmakers that the state could lose nearly $650 million in federal funding in 2015 unless Congress shifts additional money into the Highway Trust Fund.

Kentucky’s top transportation official said the state and federal governments are going to have to come up with new ways to pay for road and bridge repairs. Transportation Cabinet Secretary Mike Hancock said taxing motorists on the miles per gallon they drive is not a sustainable funding source. Besides that, migration patterns are changing.