The Federal Communications Commission has seen the future of cable TV, and it looks like the apps on your smartphone.

The Federal Communications Commission is proposing, for the first time, privacy regulations for Internet service providers. The goal is to let consumers weigh in on what information about them gets collected and how it's used.

As they connect us to the Internet, ISPs have insight into our lives — websites we frequent, apps we download or locations we visit — and may use that data for their own promotions or sell it to data brokers to be used for marketing or other purposes.

Can't watch your local news channel? It's not your TV that's broken.

Negotiations between Dish Network and Sinclair Broadcast Group have broken down, resulting in the blackout of 129 local stations across the country. It's the largest TV blackout ever in the U.S.

The standoff prompted Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler to order a meeting today with the two companies to resolve the dispute.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Net neutrality is back in the headlines after FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced his plans to present a 300-page document at a meeting later this month, which would reclassify 'broadband.' Under the current Telecommunications Act, there are multiple areas: telephone, broadcast, information. If the proposal passes, broadband would be reclassified from an information service to a telecom service. Michael Ramage, Associate Director for the Center for Telecommunications Systems Management at Murray State University, discusses the latest news, explains regulating web access as a public utility and what this might mean for consumers and communications companies on Sounds Good.

Bartmoni, Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers are discussing the implementation of new federal money to bolster wireless bandwidth in Kentucky schools.

Over $2 billion dollars will be distributed by the Federal Communications Commission nationwide to shore up broadband networks in schools and libraries. 

The Federal Communications Commission announced last month that it would propose new rules. In a blog post, Chairman Tom Wheeler insists that the open Internet rules will help maintain what's called network neutrality. That is, making certain that your Internet provider doesn't give a faster connection to a service that can pay more.