farming

Environment
2:35 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Tennessee State Representative Operated Hog Farm Without Permit for Years

Credit Tennessee General Assembly / http://www.capitol.tn.gov/

A Nashville television station is alleging Tennessee State Rep. Andy Holt has committed violations and contaminated a creek while farming hogs in Weakley County. But state regulators haven’t taken any action against him.

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Business
10:14 am
Tue December 23, 2014

Farm Fresh? Natural? Eggs Not Always What They're Cracked Up To Be

Cage-free eggs for sale in 2008 in Knoxville, Tenn.
Joel Kramer/Flickr

Originally published on Tue December 23, 2014 2:49 pm

You're in the supermarket gathering ingredients for eggnog and a Christmas Bundt cake, and you're staring at a wall of egg cartons. They're plastered with terms that all sound pretty wonderful: All-Natural, Cage-Free, Free-Range, Farm Fresh, Organic, No Hormones, Omega-3. And so on.

And yet the longer you stare at them, the more confused you become. You are tired and hungry, so you just grab the cheapest one — or the one with the most adorable chicken illustration — and head for the checkout line.

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Business
10:22 am
Thu December 11, 2014

Women's Work Is Never Done On The Farm, And Sometimes Never Counted

Owner Mary Kraft at Badger Creek Dairy outside Fort Morgan, Colo.
Luke Runyon KUNC/Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 10:45 am

The average American farmer is a white man in his late 50s. Or at least, that's who's in charge of the farm, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

But the number of female-run farms has tripled since the 1970s, to nearly 14 percent in 2012. And if you dig a little deeper, you'll find women are showing up in new roles. But because of the way farm businesses are structured, women's work often isn't included in those USDA counts.

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Business
4:56 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

Meet Local Farmers: Red Roof Ranch Alpacas in Cadiz

'Tis the season to get out the coats, scarves, earmuffs and warm socks. But maybe those socks made from sheep's wool just aren't warm enough? Introducing alpaca fiber or "the fiber of the gods" as the Incans called it. It's a luxury fiber similar to cashmere, but has a hollow core that gives it an extra insulating property, which makes it lighter and warmer. On Sounds Good, we meet Kathy Tinkham of Red Roof Ranch Alpacas in Trigg County and learn how she got into raising alpacas and some of the items in her store that will keep you warm this winter season.

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Environment
4:13 pm
Tue November 4, 2014

Why Farmers Aren't Cheering This Year's Monster Harvest

Sunlight streams into a corn storage building at a Michlig Grain storage facility in Sheffield, Illinois, U.S., on Oct. 31, 2014. The price of corn has been falling for months.
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 5:32 pm

U.S. farmers are bringing in what's expected to be a record-breaking harvest for both corn and soybeans. But for many farmers, that may be too much of a good thing.

Farmers will haul in 4 billion bushels of soybeans and 14.5 billion bushels of corn, according to USDA estimates. The problem? Demand can't keep up with that monster harvest. Corn and soybean prices have been falling for months. A bushel of corn is now worth under $4 — about half what it was two years ago.

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Society
8:37 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Once A Year, Farmers Go Back To Picking Corn By Hand — For Fun

The Illinois State Corn Husking Competition is one of nine competitions happening during harvest season all across the Midwest.
Abby Wendle NPR

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 2:46 pm

Frank Hennenfent is a typical Illinois farmer. At this time of year, he spends countless hours in an air-conditioned, GPS-equipped combine – an enormous machine that can harvest as many as 12 rows of corn at a time.

But in late September, Hennenfent was going back to the basics. He was a top competitor at the 34th annual Illinois State Corn Husking Competition.

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Culture
4:02 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Understanding the Black Patch Tobacco War of West Kentucky and Tennessee

Credit tobaccowarpilgrimage.com

As the 20th Century dawned, big business came to the dark tobacco growing region of Kentucky and Tennessee, eliminating competition, manipulating prices and undermining local control. A struggled called The Black Patch War began and lasted nearly until the outbreak of World War I. Commemorations start Friday when the Museums of Historic Hopkinsville-Christian County offer the 3rd Annual Tobacco War Pilgrimage including a raid re-enactment, a tobacco bus tour, a re-enactment of a Trial of the Nightriders and more. Kate Lochte asked Murray State Professor of History Dr. Bill Mulligan to give an overview of the conflict that embroiled this region, starting in 1904. 

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Education
4:03 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

MSU School of Agriculture: Record Enrollment, Hemp Crop Update

"It's a good time for agriculture and an even better time to be at Murray State in agriculture," says the Hutson School of Agriculture Dean Tony Brannon. He joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about another record year of enrollment, a new high profile crop approaching harvest and a fundraising gala for The Arboretum.

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Environment
1:54 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

Western Kentucky Farm Uses Drone to Survey Crops

Credit sevenspringsfarms.com

Seven Springs Farms consists of numerous farms located in Trigg, Christian, Cadlwell and Lyon Counties, and may be the first farm in the region to use drones, specifically the DJI drone that you can see in operation on YouTube. Bart Peters, the Finance Manager of Seven Springs Farms speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the business decision to use drones.

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Agriculture
3:40 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

The Shift from Farmer's Wife to Farmer: Women Are Now Running The Business

Whitney Jones WKMS

Women have helped on farms for generations, but now they’re beginning to take ownership of their duties, calling themselves farmers instead of just farmers’ wives. The US Department of Agriculture has found a steady increase of women farmers in the 2000s, which plateaued in the agency’s latest 5-year report.

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