exercise

You've heard it a million times: The hours we spend sitting in front of our computers, sitting in front of the TV and sitting just about everywhere else are adding up. We are sitting ourselves to death.

So it came as welcome news when we read last week that just 10 minutes — 10 minutes! — of walking after sitting for a long period of time can restore the damage to our vascular system.

The viruses that cause the common cold are always lurking. But consider this: Even if we touch a doorknob or keyboard that's covered in cold germs from an infected person, we don't always catch the cold.

"Sometimes when we're exposed to viruses, we end up not getting sick," says Aric Prather, a psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who studies how our behaviors can influence our health.

We continue a series of reports called Racer Scholar Profiles, highlighting Murray State Faculty research, scholarly and creative activities across college and schools. Our fourth guest is Dr. Jason Jaggers, Assistant Professor, Applied Health Sciences in the School of Nursing and Health Professions, who studies exercise concepts in special populations, including those with diabetes and HIV. Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Jaggers on Sounds Good about his research.

Vesna Cvorovic, 123rf stock photo

If you're still wrangling down your New Year's resolution, Dr. Michael Bordieri of the Murray State University Department of Psychology may have some ideas for you to consider as we end the first month of 2015. With the new year, Kate Lochte expands the bi-weekly Sounds Good conversations from the "Understanding Depression" series to include other topics of interest.

Lose weight and those pounds shuffle off, unmourned. Good riddance. Please don't come back soon.

But where does weight go when we lose it?

We talk about burning off fat, and it does burn in a way, going through a complex biochemical process. But mass can't be created or destroyed, so the atoms that made the triglycerides that plumped up the love handles have got to be somewhere.

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  An area of cancer research at the University of Kentucky is focusing on exercise for mothers during pregnancy to help prevent cancer in their children.  

Second year grad student Alyssa Jarrel is involved in conducting the study and said the research has focused so far on mice, but could very well have implications for humans.  

  "Pregnancy is such a short term intervention and it can have long term benefits for the offspring.  So, we're talking nine months for an intervention for the mom to have lifetime benefits for the child,"  Jarrel said.

The Hopkinsville City Council approved spending more than $900,000 to help fund phase-one of the city's Rails-To-Trials project. An additional $100,000 in private donations brings the total investment to $1 million for phase-one.  

Mayor Dan Kemp said he’s pleased with the way the council voted and that the walking trail will bring a dramatic improvement to residents’ way of life.

From NPR: For many families exercise doesn’t happen naturally. It has to be scheduled, and that often means carting a van full of kids to separate locations, limiting time for outdoor play. But a few families are starting to prioritize exercise by purposefully choosing to live in cities and neighborhoods that are suitable for more walking and biking.