Environment

Cheryl Davis, 123rf Stock Photo

The Monarch population has rapidly declined in the last 10 years and naturalists are urging people to plant more milkweed and pesticide free nectar plants, which comprise a butterfly waystation. Former president of the Kentucky Garden Association Joanna Kirby calls the Monarch the 'canary in the coal mine' indicating a problem in the environment. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about her monarch waystation efforts and the dedication of three in Paducah and Mayfield this weekend.

Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, via fws.gov

  Nonprofit group Friends of Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge is trying to figure out how best to clean up Marshall County’s Chestnut Creek Watershed and wants the public’s help.

Captain-tucker, Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

There are two main Butterfly emergence periods throughout the year, June and September. While the butterfly population will appear plentiful during this time, there is one species you won’t see as frequently as you would have ten years ago, the Monarch.

Todd Shoemake / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentucky’s tobacco farmers have had a relatively cool and wet summer, and that could be the culprit for higher crop disease rates.  

University of Kentucky Plant Pathologist Emily Pfeufer says farmers are reporting higher cases of black shank and bacteria-based diseases like angular leaf and target spot. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Classes begin at Murray State University Tuesday and the pre-enrollment period is still underway, with a push of students in the last week before classes begin. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte takes a look at the numbers with MSU Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Fred Dietz, why final enrollment numbers don't come in until October and how changing admission standards will impact retention.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Two adorable little puppies visited WKMS today, Frankie and Lincoln. They are basset hound/Jack Russell terrier mixes, approximately six weeks old and four pounds each. Lincoln is brown and white, seems to take after his father's basset hound traits with a larger body, wider feet and a laid back demeanor. Frankie is black and white with spots on her legs. She has more terrier qualities, a little more adventurous and energetic than her brother. On Sounds Good, Todd Hatton meets the puppies with Kathy Hodge of the Humane Society of Calloway County and learns more about Barkaid coming to Murray.

James Hawkins, publicdomainpictures.net

Nine-banded armadillos can be found in Land Between the Lakes, eating pesky insects like yellowjackets, wasps and ants (and some plants, too). On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Woodlands Nature Station Lead Naturalist John Pollpeter to learn more facts about the leathery little mammal, including a unique reproductive trait, what happens if you scare one and whether or not you can get leprosy if you eat one.

Governor's Office

  Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear was unclear Tuesday evening about whether his Energy and Environment Cabinet would continue working on a plan to help the state comply with the Environmental Protection Agency’s final Clean Power Plan, which it released the day before.

J. Tyler Franklin/Louisville Public Media

  Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway says he’ll again sue the Environmental Protection Agency over new federal carbon dioxide rules. The Clean Power Plan calls for Kentucky to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants nearly 30 percent from 2012 levels by 2030.

Wikimedia Commons/Author: PixOnTrax

  Kentucky’s coal industry has recorded another dismal quarter, where both coal jobs and production have declined across the state.

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