Environment

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

TransCanada, the company that owns and operates the Keystone Pipeline, says that an estimated 210,000 gallons, or 5,000 barrels, of oil have spilled near the small town of Amherst, S.D.

Kenn W. Kiser, morgueFile.com

Several lawmakers from the Ohio Valley region have joined a bipartisan push to fund what’s called carbon capture and storage. That technology can strip CO2 from power plant emissions. But it is also extremely expensive. Glynis Board of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports that the mounting urgency to address climate change has caused some who were skeptical of the technology to take a fresh look.

Editor's note: The Environmental Protection Agency has approved the use of mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia bacteria as a "biopesticide" in 20 states and the District of Columbia. The bacteria keep mosquitoes from spreading diseases like dengue and Zika. Back in 2012, NPR's Joe Palca wrote about scientist Scott O'Neill's 20 years of struggle to make the idea of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes work. Here is his story.

Abrahami, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5)

An environmental nonprofit has removed more than an acre of invasive plant species near part of a creek in Tennessee's capital. 

Pixabay

  The National Weather Service in Paducah is encouraging volunteers to join the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network, or ‘CoCoRaHS'.

Kentucky Mesonet via Facebook

The statewide weather and climate monitoring network Kentucky Mesonet has installed its 69th station, which is  in a high-risk area for tornadoes.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

Utility regulators say Kentuckians who heat their homes with natural gas will see somewhat higher prices compared to a year ago.

University of Kentucky

  President Donald Trump is nominating a Lexington engineer to fill the top spot at the federal Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation and Enforcement.

The Department of the Interior announced Thursday that Steven Gardner of Lexington consulting firm ECSI has been tapped for the role. Gardner has more than four decades of experience working with and advocating for the mining industry.

On a fall day in New York's Adirondack Mountains, a helicopter swept over a bog as state forest rangers scrambled below over rocks and muddy streams. It was a bright afternoon in one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, but this was a search for yet another missing hiker. A 28-year-old New Jersey man named Alex Stevens had vanished into this vast wilderness nearly two weeks earlier.

In the gritty industrial town of Yiwu, workers prepare jeans to be dyed in a vivid range of colors.

Two months ago, this factory — and this entire city, located in China's eastern province of Zhejiang — was a much quieter place. Inspection crews from the environmental bureau had shut businesses down, cutting electricity and gas so that they could determine who was following China's environmental laws and who wasn't.

The boss of this factory, who asked that his name not be used for fear of punishment by local officials, says he's never seen anything like it.

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