Education

education.ky.gov

Kentucky Department of Education officials continue to seek public comment on developing a new school accountability system.  A 12th opportunity, in the form of a virtual town hall meeting, is scheduled for tonight

KCTCS Schools

  The president of Kentucky’s community college system makes $375,000 annually, a paycheck that’s right on the money when compared with similar institutions, at least according to a school-funded consultant’s report.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Council on Postsecondary Education has approved Murray State University's proposed tuition fees for the next academic year.

MSU Public Relations

Murray State University has appointed a new Chief of Police and Director of Public Safety and Emergency Management. Jamie Herring takes the position after a national search. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Brynn Jones, a rising senior at Murray High School, traveled to Sacramento, California, with other qualifying students for the National Catholic Forensic League Grand National Tournament and she returned to Murray as  the National Champion in Original Oratory. She and her coach Michael Robinson speak with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about what it took to bring home the win.

melpomen, 123rf Stock Photo

Scholarships totaling $7.5 million dollars will pay for Kentucky high school seniors to take dual credit classes. Governor Matt Bevin and Workforce Development Secretary Hal Heiner unveiled the Dual Credit Scholarship Program Wednesday at Russell County High School.

St. Catharine College To Close At End Of July

Jun 1, 2016
St. Catharine College, via Facebook

Officials from St. Catharine College announced Wednesday that the school will shutter its doors next month.

Bevin-Hampton Administration, screenshot via YouTube

A new jobs-training program is aimed at helping young Kentucky adults with the transition out of foster care. Governor Matt Bevin unveiled the Fostering Success program this week.

What made Mozart great? Or Bobby Fischer? Or Serena Williams?

The answer sits somewhere on the scales of human achievement. On one side: natural talent. On the other: hard work. Many would argue that success hangs in some delicate balance between them. But not Anders Ericsson.

Gilbert Sargent is a jolly, loquacious 74-year-old. For nearly everybody in the small suburb of Versailles, Ky., he goes by "Sarge."

For 25 years, Sarge has been working on and off as a school bus driver. Today he drives for Woodford County Public Schools, a district just outside Lexington. Sarge was meant to drive a school bus, he says, because of his love for children.

He drives bus No. 7.

2:35 p.m. Sarge heads out for his first afternoon pickup at Simmons Elementary School.

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