Education

This week, another school shooting is dominating news headlines. At least 10 people were killed, and 10 others wounded, when a gunman opened fire inside Santa Fe High School, a small-town high school located halfway between Houston and Galveston, Texas.

This is a developing news story, you can check npr.org for the most recent updates.

Betsy DeVos spotlights religious schools on NYC trip

JENNIFER FULLER/WSIU

SIU President Randy Dunn said he won't resign - but acknowledges it will take some time to bring opposing groups back together within the university's system.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Graves County Public Schools superintendent Kim Dublin said the City of Mayfield’s annexation of some of the school district’s property is ‘taxation without representation.’ Dublin held a press conference on Friday to clear up what the board said is a ‘miscommunication’ regarding pending legal issues with the city.

rido, 123rf Stock Photo

A lawsuit charges that a Kentucky student was expelled over commentary on "the recent national trend of school shootings."

SIU

The House lawmaker who represents Southern Illinois University–Carbondale is calling on SIU System President Randy Dunn to resign immediately.

123RF STOCK PHOTO

  An updated child abuse reporting policy has resulted in 611 reports in one Tennessee school district during this school year.

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Murray State University's Spring Commencement ceremony was last weekend, in which 1,509 degrees were conferred. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf sits down with President Bob Davies to reflect on the ceremony. They also talk about some recent student competitions, a faculty innovation initiative, the tuition and fees increase, a partnership with WKCTC and more.

Sergey Kuzmin, 123rf stock photo

Records show that the University of Tennessee has pumped millions from its endowment into private investment funds, including many in the Cayman Islands.

The months-long wave of teacher protests, which has rolled through roughly half a dozen states already, swelled and crashed on the front stoop of North Carolina's Capitol building Wednesday. Demonstrators donned red and gathered in the capital, Raleigh, to demand better pay and better school funding.

Last week, teachers-to-be WinnieHope Mamboleo and Cristina Chase Lane marched across the graduation stage at North Carolina State University.

This week, they'll be marching with future colleagues at the state capitol in Raleigh, asking for better pay and better school funding.

North Carolina is the sixth state to see teacher walkouts in the past four months. The others are West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Colorado and Arizona. The Tar Heel state ranks 39th both in per-student spending and in average teacher pay as of 2017.

Pages