Murray State University 1961 Shield Yearbook, Courtesy of Wesley Bolin at Pogue Library

A group of six college students walked from Murray State University across the street to a small restaurant, about to quietly protest its “white-only” policy. Entering the establishment, the five white boys from New York ordered meals for the group. When the food was ready, Nancy Tyler Demartra, the first African American to attend MSU full-time and eventually graduate, stood up to pay. When the cashiers refused her money, the entire group said “no, thanks,” and walked out. It took about three months of visits like these, but with the help of others on campus the group finally pushed the restaurant to adopt an “open” serving policy. That was 1961. Fifty-four years later, Nancy speaks with Kate on Sounds Good about her experiences at MSU and her accomplishments in the Human and Civil Rights arenas.

A pathway can lead just about anywhere so who knows where we might end up. The journey is the thing! An episode of Classical Pathways with host George Eldred can take us through time musically from sunrise to night. Other examples might be music from a given locale, perhaps a musical “cruise” calling at many ports, or a “genealogy” looking at composers and those who studied under them. 

Hear Classical Pathways on the WKMS All-Classical Channel Sundays at 9 a.m., Wednesdays at 2 p.m. and Saturdays at 6 p.m.

Western Kentucky Botanical Garden, Facebook

The Western Kentucky Botanical Garden in Owensboro wraps up the summer with Balloons Over The Garden, the last weekend of August. Originally part of the Dazzling Daylillies Festival last June, the event was rescheduled due to weather. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Rob Blackham, Vice President of the Western Kentucky Botanical Garden Board and engineer involved with "Balloons Over The Garden" about how one can cross 'riding in a hot air balloon' off their bucket list and whether or not 'selfie sticks' are allowed on the ride.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Downtown Paducah's Columbia Theatre is in the early stages of rebirth, or that's what members of the Columbia Club hope. The massive theatre first opened to the public in 1927 and has been deteriorating since its last show in 1987. The estimated cost to renovate the space is six million dollars, which the club hopes to raise through grants and local investors. Matt Markgraf takes us on a tour of the building while he lends a hand on a recent clean-up day.

Bluegrass music is just a part of the territory around Owensboro and Daviess County.

Now there’s a more formal push, as part of a promotional campaign, to let people know it’s a year-round place to hear bluegrass music or jam.  

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University Assistant Professor of History Dr. Zackery Heern says modern Shi'ism started with the "modernity" in general - around the 1700s, roughly the same time as the Enlightenment in Europe, birth of the United States and French Revolution. He's published a book titled The Emergence of Modern Shi'ism: Islamic Reform in Iraq and Iran. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Heern about his research and gains some context and clarity into the historical differences between Shi'ism and Sunnism.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Henry Wildy Harding Sr. was among the first settlers to Calloway County after Kentucky's first governor Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson negotiated the Jackson Purchase with the Chickasaw. Back then, this land was mostly untouched wilderness. Homes, barns and fences had to be built by felling trees. Harding settled on approximately 1,000 acres of what is now the northwestern part of Murray and Calloway County. Between two wives (his first died before moving to western Kentucky), he fathered 18 children, five of whom fought for the Confederate Army in the Civil War.

Later in his life, he oversaw the local school district, donating a portion of his land for one of the school houses and also founded First Baptist Church of Murray. David Reed of Gilbertsville is his great great grandson, semi-retired District Court Judge and co-author of a book The Ancestors and Descendants of Henry Wildy Harding Sr. with his cousin. They have a family reunion this weekend and Reed speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about Harding Sr.'s remarkable legacy.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

  Calloway County Public Library's Sandy Linn stops by Sounds Good to speak with Kate Lochte bout this week's Colonial Kids Day Programs sponsored by members of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the upcoming soulful acoustic pop Butch Rice concert, the summer of programming and some of her thoughts on Harper Lee's new novel Go Set A Watchman, the subject of the new WKMS Book Club.

In Court, Your Face Could Determine Your Fate

Jul 17, 2015

Your face has a profound effect on the people around you. Its expression can prompt assumptions about how kind, mean or trustworthy you are. And for some people, a study finds, it could help determine their fate in court.

More than 1,200 boxes of books sorted by subject matter are now on display at Paducah's St. Paul Lutheran Church for the Friends of the McCracken County Public Library Summer Book Sale Friday and Saturday. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Jennie Boyarski about the sale highlights.