Commentaries

Uncommon Mystery: Ask Miss Mott

Nov 11, 2013

Mystery enthusiast Michael Cohen reviews an "uncommon mystery" to consider for your reading list. The mystery "Ask Miss Mott" by E. Phillips Oppenheim is a thriller published in 1935, an early adventure spy novel.

E. Phillips Oppenheim, Ask Miss Mott (1935)

bbc.co.uk

In the same week Congress decides on whether or not to defund the Affordable Care Act and/or prevent a government shutdown, President Barack Obama made his remarks to the United Nations General Assembly, outlining the role of the United States in the Middle East and Worldwide. Commentator, Murray State History Professor and Foreign Policy Analyst, Dr. Brian Clardy examines the underlying message of the Presidents' speech and its potential challenges. Please note that the views expressed in this commentator are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of WKMS.

Roy Helton divides his time between teaching in the English Department at Murray State University and indulging his passion for gardening. In this edition of "From the Garden Gate," Roy talks about his visit to The Garden Museum in London. 

The Garden Museum in London

Whenever I teach in England as I did for a month this summer, I always feel as if I’m in a kind of gardeners’ heaven.  This summer I got a chance to visit a museum devoted entirely to gardening.  Located across the River Thames from the Houses of Parliament, the Garden History Museum is housed in the rescued and restored medieval church of St Mary-at-Lambeth.

On this day 50 years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech to a crowd of over 200,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Commentator and Murray State History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on this defining moment of the Civil Rights Movement, and it's cultural significance then and 50 years later. 

Commentator Celia Brewer wonders why we as a society tolerate one form on injustice but loudly protest another. Please note, the thoughts expressed in this commentary are those of the commentator and do not necessarily reflect the views of WKMS or its staff.

Carousel, the 1956 movie made from the hit Broadway musical, recently aired on Turner Classic Movies. Told in flashback, the movie opens with a carnival barker named Billy Bigelow in heaven. He had died in a bungled robbery, desperate for money to support his wife, Julie Jordan, and their baby on the way. Billy is granted a day to return to earth to console his troubled teenaged daughter Louise.

On this day 50 years ago, President John F. Kennedy gave his famous "ich bin ein Berliner" speech to West Berlin, underlying support for the West 22 months after Soviet-supported East Germany erected the Berlin Wall. Commentator and Murray State History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on this statement of US policy and its impact on the Cold War.

A few days ago in my American History class, I lectured on the early years of the Cold War of the late 1940s and early 1950s. With rapt attention, young Racer Nation listened to me drone on and on about the Berlin Airlift and the fact that the city would become what I called a “pregnant symbol” of the U.S.-Soviet conflict. 

Wikimedia Commons

This week's "From the Garden Gate" is all about back of the border plants. Murray resident Roy Helton divides his time between teaching in the English Department at Murray State University and indulging his passion for gardening.

Just as a stage play has a backdrop to frame and showcase what’s happening out front, a garden border needs a backdrop as well.  In some respects that shouldn’t be too hard a problem to solve.  I mean, it’s not as if there aren’t plenty of tall plants out there in the world.  And since finding tall plants is not, as they say, exactly rocket science, I thought I would confine myself to mentioning a few of the plants that I have found useful and successful in my own garden borders.

From the Garden Gate: The White Garden

Jun 13, 2013

Murray resident Roy Helton divides his time between teaching in the English Department at Murray State University and indulging his passion for gardening.  In this week's "From the Garden Gate" commentary, the topic is white gardens. Similar in design to the English cottage garden, white gardens feature flowers that are white or silvery, with the intent to overwhelm the viewer with a single color. 

Wikimedia Commons

Today marks 50 years since civil rights activist Medgar Evers was gunned down in his driveway in Jackson, Mississippi by white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith. His murder and the subsequent trial sparked a cultural uproar and inspired national protests. A week later, President Kennedy submitted his Civil Rights bill to Congress, and the March on Washington would follow that summer. Commentator and Murray State history professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on how he came to learn about Medgar Evers - his sacrifices, and his legacy. 

Facebook

Michael Cohen, Professor Emeritus at Murray State University, brings us his latest 'Uncommon Mystery,' When Beggars Die by E.A. Allen. 

E. A. Allen, When Beggars Die (2013) ISBN: 978-1-60653-066-5

When I met Ed Allen—that’s a great moniker, by the way, for one writing in the tradition of Edgar Allan Poe—he was finishing a Ph.D. in history at Tulane and I was teaching at the University of New Orleans. He went on to a career that included a post as Senior CIA Analyst for European Security Affairs. I can’t think of a better background for someone writing a historical thriller about the precarious balance of power in Europe at the dawn of the twentieth century. That’s the period when the action of When Beggars Die takes place, just after the turn of the century, when the English King Edward VII is in Paris to negotiate a treaty. 

Pages