Commentary: Bandit (A Boy and His Cat)

Aug 22, 2014

Madisonville author Patricia Wiles returns as a WKMS commentator after a hiatus of many years. She reflects on "Bandit," the story of her son and his cat, from kitten to college.

Commentary: The Roots of Technology

Aug 21, 2014

Madisonville author Patricia Wiles returns as a WKMS commentator after a hiatus of many years. She reflects on "The Roots of Technology" and how, while 'graying gracefully' she and her husband have bonded over their iPhones.

WKMS File Photo

On August 2, 2014, a record attendance showed up for the 134th Fancy Farm Picnic to hear with classic stump speeches from local and statewide politicians vying for the hotseat. Murray State history professor, commentator and political junkie Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on this year's event, one week later and some of his impressions ahead of the November election.

"All my life I've been sick and tired. Now I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired." - Fannie Lou Hamer

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a campaign to open the polls to African-American voters in Mississippi, which became a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights era. The summer marked a turning point in ending white supremacy in the state and decades of isolation in the Deep South for black voters ahead of the 1964 elections. Commentator and Murray State history professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects back on Freedom Summer and its legacy 50 years later.


Earlier this month, Georgia lawmakers passed a sweeping gun bill, known as the "guns everywhere bill" allowing licensed owners to carry firearms in many churches, bars, and government buildings. One of the provisions allows school districts to let teachers carry guns. Commentator Celia Brewer draws on a personal experience when living in New Orleans to express her concern over expanding gun rights.

Wikimedia Commons

Former Senate Majority Leader and White House Chief of Staff Howard Baker died last Thursday at age 88. Baker was one of the key players in Ronald Reagan's historic tax and spending cuts and was an influential member of the Senate committee that investigated the Watergate scandal. He served as US Senator from Tennessee from 1967 to 1985 and Commentator and History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy remembers the Republican Senator as a voice of reason in the later half of the 20th Century.

Library of Congress, Wikimedia Commons

Fifty years ago this Sunday (February 9, 2014), four mop-topped lads from Liverpool took to a television stage and changed the world. The Beatles made their stateside debut on The Ed Sullivan Show in three consecutive headlining performances to great anticipation and fanfare, drawing over 73 million viewers and launching the 'British Invasion.' Commentator and Murray State history professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on their first performance and its cultural impact over 50 years.

Murray State Professor Emeritus and commentator Michael Cohen surveys uncommon authors of mysteries, whose day jobs have nothing to do with whodunits. He's the author of "Murder Most Fair: The Appeal of Mystery Fiction," published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press in 2000. See more uncommon mysteries.

Professor Emeritus Michael Cohen reviews British author Caroline Graham's first mystery, The Killings At Badger's Drift,  published in 1987 and adapted ten years later as the first episode of the British ITV series The Midsomer Murders.

Michael Cohen is Professor Emeritus at Murray State University. He is the author of Murder Most Fair:  The Appeal of Mystery Fiction, published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press in 2000. 

Mystery enthusiast Michael Cohen reviews an "uncommon mystery" to consider for your reading list. The mystery "Ask Miss Mott" by E. Phillips Oppenheim is a thriller published in 1935, an early adventure spy novel.

E. Phillips Oppenheim, Ask Miss Mott (1935)