Charlottesville

Spotify and other streaming services have begun removing white supremacist content from their platforms, as websites and musicians alike scramble to distance themselves from the white nationalist movement.

In a statement on Wednesday, Spotify blamed the labels and distributors that supply music to its database but said "material that favors hatred or incites violence against race, religion, sexuality or the like is not tolerated by us. Spotify takes immediate action to remove any such material as soon as it has been brought to our attention."

comer.house.gov, cropped

Republican U.S. Congressman James Comer says there are no 'good guys' in the neo-Nazi and white nationalist movement. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Paducah Board of Commissioners issued a statement on Wednesday condemning racial hatred and violence in the wake of events in Charlottesville, Virginia

Ryland Barton

A bipartisan group of community leaders and lawmakers called for the removal of the Jefferson Davis statue from the state Capitol rotunda during a rally on Wednesday.

The aftermath of the violent protest and counterprotests in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend continue to reverberate across the country — sparking discussions about race and the country's Civil War past.

Mourners gathered in Charlottesville on Wednesday to remember Heather Heyer, who was killed on Saturday when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting the white nationalist rally. Attendees were asked to wear purple, Heyer's favorite color, in her memory.

Updated at 7:26 p.m. ET

In a stunning reversal from comments he made just one day prior, President Trump said on Tuesday "there's blame on both sides" for the violence in Charlottesville, Va.

Stu Johnson

Hundreds of people gathered in Lexington’s courthouse square Monday evening to remember those who died in Charlottesville, Virginia, this past weekend in connection with a white supremacists’ rally. The almost two-hour event included singing, chanting, candle lighting and comments from politicians, spiritual leaders and social activists.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Almost 48 hours after violence engulfed Charlottesville, Va., President Trump called out white nationalist groups by name. Trump's remarks on Monday followed criticism that his initial statement about the clash of protesters did not condemn racist groups specifically.

How should educators confront bigotry, racism and white supremacy? The incidents in Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend pushed that question from history to current events.

Becca Schimmel

A vigil calling for solidarity with Charlottesville and an end to white supremacy was held in downtown Bowling Green Sunday night.

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