CDC

People are still dying of cancer linked to asbestos, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control says, despite decades of regulations meant to limit dangerous exposure.

Starting in 1971, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has regulated how much asbestos workers can be exposed to, because it contains tiny fibers that can cause lung disease or cancer if they are swallowed or inhaled.

Alexander Korzh, 123RF Stock Photo

A team from Calloway County’s Obesity Workgroup is participating in a Centers for Disease Control-funded national conference this spring to improve their project targeting childhood obesity.

Federal health officials may be about to get greatly enhanced powers to quarantine people, as part of an ongoing effort to stop outbreaks of dangerous contagious diseases.

The new powers are outlined in a set of regulations the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published late last month to update the agency's quarantine authority for the first time since the 1940s.

via CDC webpage for photos of the mumps

Though it might be hard to remember, most everyone gets the Measles, Mumps and Rubella, or MMR, vaccine when they are young. But according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, reports of the mumps have jumped from just over 1,000 cases in 2015 to over 4,000 cases and counting in 2016, and the majority of those numbers can be found in the Midwest.

Cayusa / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

new report says some Kentuckians could be drinking a cancer-causing chemical called chromium-6.

Sorry, kids. Your pediatrician will probably give you the flu vaccine in the form of a shot this year.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Tuesday that it doesn't recommend using the flu vaccine that comes as a nasal spray. That's because the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at its performance last year and concluded it wasn't up to snuff.

How Best To Test For Zika Virus?

Mar 10, 2016

Let's say you're a pregnant woman who recently traveled to Latin America or the Caribbean. You got a little sick shortly after the trip, with some combination of mild fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. The big question now is: Did you have Zika virus? And, if so, is your fetus still healthy?

"Probably every day, patients come in questioning whether or not they would qualify for testing," says Dr. Christine Curry, an obstetrician-gynecologist at the University of Miami, and Jackson Memorial Hospital.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beating the drum again: We're consuming too much sodium and it's a reason we have such high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Not me, you say? Well, chances are, yes, you.

If you're traveling overseas for the holidays or in the new year, there are some things you don't want to bring back with you — like mumps, which has cropped up in Scotland; measles, which is circulating in Germany; and mosquito-borne diseases that are spreading in certain Latin American countries, the Caribbean and even Hawaii, where more than 150 people have been diagnosed with dengue fever on the big island.

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

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