CDC

How Best To Test For Zika Virus?

Mar 10, 2016

Let's say you're a pregnant woman who recently traveled to Latin America or the Caribbean. You got a little sick shortly after the trip, with some combination of mild fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. The big question now is: Did you have Zika virus? And, if so, is your fetus still healthy?

"Probably every day, patients come in questioning whether or not they would qualify for testing," says Dr. Christine Curry, an obstetrician-gynecologist at the University of Miami, and Jackson Memorial Hospital.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beating the drum again: We're consuming too much sodium and it's a reason we have such high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Not me, you say? Well, chances are, yes, you.

If you're traveling overseas for the holidays or in the new year, there are some things you don't want to bring back with you — like mumps, which has cropped up in Scotland; measles, which is circulating in Germany; and mosquito-borne diseases that are spreading in certain Latin American countries, the Caribbean and even Hawaii, where more than 150 people have been diagnosed with dengue fever on the big island.

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

Last year's flu vaccine didn't work very well. This year's version should do a much better job protecting people against the flu, federal health officials said Thursday.

An analysis of the most common strains of flu virus that are circulating in the United States and elsewhere found they match the strains included in this year's vaccine, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Taber Andrew Bain / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentucky is seeing a rapid increase in the number of syphilis infections, mirroring a national trend. 

Public health officials are seeking expanded education and treatment for the sexually transmitted disease. Kentucky’s number of syphilis cases has doubled since 2009, to just over 10 cases per 100-thousand residents.

marchofdimes.org

A new report shows Kentucky continues to make strides in reducing the number of babies born premature.  Just over 12 percent of babies in the state last year were born before 37 weeks of pregnancy, which was an improvement for the 7th year in a row. 

The commonwealth earned a “C” on the latest report card from the March of Dimes. Only a few years ago, the state was failing.  Katrina Smith with the Kentucky March of Dimes Chapter credits the improvement to better education.

Are You Prepared for Emergency Situations?

Sep 26, 2014
CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response, Facebook

September is Emergency Preparedness Month, a time where one needs to think or rethink plans in the case of an emergency from smaller disasters like a house fire to a car wreck to larger emergencies like an earthquake or region-wide ice storm. Calloway County Director of Emergency Management Bill Call joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to reflect on preparedness at home. 

Wikimedia Commons

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that Kentucky medical facilities did not receive tainted steroids responsible for a fungal meningitis outbreak that has killed 11 people in the US. However, the Kentucky Department for Public Health reports that five Kentuckians have been diagnosed with the illness after receiving the epidural injections in Tennessee medical facilities.

Paducah Among Nation's Sleepiest Cities

Aug 14, 2012
wikipedia.org

The website SleepBetter.org has ranked Paducah third among the nation’s sleepiest cities. The site got the rankings by analyzing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System. Paducahans averaged 9.6 days of lost sleep each month, and nearly 26 percent reported not getting enough sleep more than half the time.