Asian Carp

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed spending $275 million to upgrade defenses against an invading force. The enemy? A fish. Specifically, Asian carp that are threatening to break through to the Great Lakes.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

  A $1.2 billion dollar industry dependent on native fish in the Kentucky and Barkley Lakes is under threat. The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife and state Tourism, Arts and Heritage Council blame an invasive fish - the Asian Carp. Officials are looking to create a commercial fishing industry to cull the carp from state waters.

ERICA PETERSON, WFPL

An Asian carp processing facility in Ballard County is planning to double its export numbers and create new jobs in the region.

Erica Peterson, WFPL

  A state Fish and Wildlife committee is recommending the full commission approve a plan to raise boat registration fees to combat the spread of invasive Asian carp in the commonwealth.

Asian carp are an invasive species, and they’ve been in the Mississippi and Ohio River basins for several years. They’re also in Kentucky and Barkley lakes in Western Kentucky. And once they make it into a body of water, they’re almost impossible to get out.

Jeremy Shiflet, KY Fish & Wildlife

Regional Fish and Wildlife crews gathered in several locations along the Kentucky and Barkley lakes last week for a three day ‘Carp Blitz’ in a collective effort to track the invasive Asian carp species.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is organizing a “Carp Blitz” next month to shed some light on the growing population of invasive Asian carp in Kentucky and Barkley lakes.

Whitney Jones, WKMS, cropped

A Murray State University professor is spearheading a study on the movements of Asian carp in Kentucky Lake.

Graves County Welcomes New Carp Processing Plant

Oct 7, 2015
Whitney Jones / WKMS

A new Graves County carp processing plant could bring nearly 70 new jobs to the area. Blue Shore Fishery, along with local and state officials, christened the 11,000-square-foot Farmington facility Tuesday.

USFWS Photo

  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is providing Kentucky $240k to fight the spread of Asian carp.  

The abundant invasive species outcompetes the native fish for food causing an economic distress for local fisheries.  

KDFWR

State wildlife officials say commercializing the harvest of Asian Carp may be the only way to eradicate the invasive species, but it may lead to problems in itself. Ron Brooks, Fisheries Director of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about plans for over-harvesting Asian Carp and Kentucky's lucrative caviar industry.

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