archaeology

Painted by Herb Roe, Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA-3.0,2.5,2.0,1.0

The earliest dates of activity at the Kincaid Mounds in Massac County, Illinois, go back to 1050 A.D. It was once a large village, the capital of a Native American chiefdom, which existed until 1400 A.D., says John Schwegman of the Kincaid Mounds Support Organization. On Sounds Good, Austin Carter speaks with Schwegman about the Archaeology Field Day at the site this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Highway 91 goes north from Marion, Kentucky to the Ohio River, where there's a small ferry crossing to Cave-In-Rock, Illinois. That limestone cave, now a feature of a small state park along the banks of the river, was said to have harbored vicious river pirates at the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries, including the infamous Harpe Brothers. Dr. Mark Wagner, interim director and staff archeologist of Southern Illinois Carbondale's Center for Archeological Investigations, says that historical record only places one particular pirate there and his name was Samuel Mason. Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Wagner on Sounds Good to learn more about the fearsome figure who prowled the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.

Poverty Point State Historic Site, Facebook

Tracy Ross speaks with Anthony Ortmann, Murray State Archaeologist, contributing to new thinking about the prehistoric earthworks at Poverty Point. These were built about 3500 years ago on the edge of the Mississippi floodplain in northeastern Louisiana. One of the mounds stands 72-feet high and has a base almost the size of 10 football fields. They speak about how Anthony came to work at Poverty Point and why the site is historically significant, also, new findings and research about the site. Click here for more about Poverty Point and how to visit.

December 21 and 'The Maya Sense of Time'

Nov 26, 2012
crystalinks.com

Are we just under one month away from the end of the world on December 21 as predicted by the Mayan calendar? Well, this is news to modern-day Mayans. Kate Lochte brings us more about “The Maya Sense of Time” with Zach Zorich, who wrote the article of this title for the November/December issue of Archaeology, a publication of the Archaeological Institute of America. First, we hear about time-keeping by the Maya, whose culture spread across what is now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, northern Honduras, and El Salvador.

The Army Corps of Engineers’ Memphis District and six Indian tribes signed an agreement Tuesday about the disposition and handling of human remains. Corps archaeologists have identified nearly 250 archaeological sites in the 11,000 acres of the floodway that are most susceptible to flood damage. Dr. Robert Dunn is an archaeologist with the Corps. He says his organization consulted with tribal leaders to reach an agreement that calls for the respectful treatment of human remains.