aerial drones

The Consumer Technology Association forecasts that 400,000 drones will be sold in the United States this holiday season. That's not to mention the commercial drones being developed by Google (now known as Alphabet), Amazon, Wal-Mart and others.

Impreza54, Wikimedia Commons

State Farm Insurance, with offices in Kentucky, has won federal approval to test the use of drones in damage assessments. 

Where Can Drones Fly? Legal Limits Are Up In the Air

Aug 10, 2014

It's getting easier for the average civilian to own drones.

The word may bring to mind million-dollar jets that carry bombs, but a drone is any aircraft that doesn't have passengers or a pilot onboard. Some look like sophisticated remote-control helicopters and model airplanes.

They're available online and in stores, some for less than $100. But whether and where owners are allowed to fly those drones falls in a legal gray area.

Seven Springs Farms consists of numerous farms located in Trigg, Christian, Cadlwell and Lyon Counties, and may be the first farm in the region to use drones, specifically the DJI drone that you can see in operation on YouTube. Bart Peters, the Finance Manager of Seven Springs Farms speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the business decision to use drones.

The price of drones is dropping — a decent one could cost you $300 — but the reality of the devices flying around cities and neighborhoods doesn't sit well with a lot of Americans.

Are they just paranoid?

Three months ago, when Michael Kirschner and his wife purchased a new condo in San Francisco, they were not concerned about drones. They fell in love with the unit because of its big picture windows.

"You have a view that reaches all the way out to the Golden Gate Bridge," Kirschner says.

Dkroetsch, Wikimedia Commons

A civil liberties group in Kentucky says there are currently no state laws on the books regulating the use of drones by law enforcement groups.

That’s why the Kentucky ACLU is supporting a bill in the General Assembly that would prohibit the police from using drones to collect evidence on an individual without first getting a warrant. 


A Kentucky state representative who has co-sponsored legislation that limits the use of surveillance drones says the bill provides an exemption for the use of drones by businesses, like the ones that Amazon plans to use for the delivery of products.

Amazon is looking at drastically reducing its delivery times — to 30 minutes or less — as it plans a new service called Prime Air that it says could debut in a few years. In an interview on CBS' 60 Minutes, CEO Jeff Bezos said the giant online retailer plans to use semi-autonomous drones to carry purchases to customers.

That's got tech experts buzzing about whether the idea will fly.


A bipartisan pair of Kentucky representatives has pre-filed a bill that would require warrants for any information gathered by drones.

Senator Paul Shows Concern For 'FEMA-Purchased Drones'

Jun 25, 2013
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Kentucky’s junior senator said he’s concerned about grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency being used to purchase drones for surveillance.

Republican Rand Paul expressed that view at a hearing today of the Senate’s Homeland Security Subcommittee. He claimed FEMA’s fusion centers, which were created by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security to promote the sharing of information, do not have a stellar record for defending civil liberties.