World Cafe

Weeknights at 7pm
  • Hosted by David Dye

The premier public radio showcase for contemporary music serving up an eclectic blend that includes blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country. 

Last week, Kate Tempest — rapper, Ted Hughes Award-winning poet and playwright from South London — played a show at the Boot and Saddle in Philadelphia. If you've never been there, it's a loud room, filled with the noise of everyone checking their phones, talking, ordering drinks.

Southern California's The Wild Reeds is made up of three singers, each one also a songwriter, who have been combining their voices since they met in college. Each of the women — Kinsey Lee, Sharon Silva and Mackenzie Howe — has a distinctive style, but together they find a way to blend them to create amazing harmonies.

Andy Shauf's latest album, The Party, landed on last year's short list for Canada's prestigious Polaris Music Prize. It's filled with songs that chronicle the awkward moments and juicy encounters that can happen at a house party in a small town: the half-wit spilling his guts after a bottle of wine, the friend making late-night confessions to his crush while her boyfriend stands oblivious and stoned in the corner, what it feels like to be the first person to show up at the party.

Ray Davies On World Cafe

Apr 21, 2017

In this session, we welcome the legendary frontman of The Kinks, Ray Davies, who is backed by The Jayhawks on his new solo album, Americana. One of the themes Davies writes about in this new batch of songs is his relationship with the United States. He says that when The Kinks first came to the U.S.

Charlie Worsham is ready for his close-up. The 31-year-old Mississippi native moved to Nashville 10 years ago after attending Boston's prestigious Berklee College of Music. He's been a favorite of country music insiders ever since. Worsham released his first solo album, Rubber Band, in 2013; now, he's offering his second, Beginning Of Things, out April 21.

Happy April 20, or — in certain circles — 420 day. The history around April 20's unofficial designation as Weed Day around the world is a little hazy. Some say it started with the Grateful Dead. Others say 420 is police code for "pot smoking in progress." Still other stories start with "The Waldos," a group of five friends who say they coined the term 420 in 1971 to refer to a certain hour of the afternoon. There are probably as many stories about 420 day's origins as there are strains of the herb.

In this studio session, Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears showcase the funky, soulful sound of their latest record, Backlash. The band comes stacked with a full horn section and a lead singer who can really shred on the guitar. Here, Lewis talks about the dramatic changes he and his bandmates have seen in their hometown of Austin, Texas, over the past few years, and how those changes have impacted the music scene.

Grammy-winning guitarist and producer Eric Krasno's collaboration credits read like a who's who of the music industry over the past couple decades.

Gabriel Garzón-Montano's latest record, Jardín, is liquid-smooth, intricate and organic. It's the sum of Garzón-Montano's many influences: the slick pop of New York City, the cumbia flair of his Colombian dad and even hanging out with famed minimalist composer Philip Glass when he was 5 years old:

It's hard to imagine listening to Led Zeppelin's "Stairway To Heaven" without remembering the classic "No 'Stairway' — denied!" scene in Wayne's World. Once voted the No.

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