Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

Common legislation known as “Right to Farm” bills date to the 1970s, as expanding development encroached on traditional farming areas. But as Nicole Erwin of Ohio Valley ReSource reports, some Daviess County, Kentucky residents say that well-meaning law has been used to shield an industrial scale hog operation.

paducahsymphony.org

On Sounds Good, George Eldred and Paducah Symphony Orchestra Maestro Raffaele Ponti preview the Saturday evening concert, "Mendelssohn, Hanson, & Debussy" at The Carson Center in Paducah. The concert includes a performance by Max Crofton, tuba (2016 Young Artist Competition Winner).

Aaron Payne | Ohio Valley ReSource

With the opioid crisis driving up overdose rates across the Ohio Valley, a once-obscure medication is becoming a household feature. Naloxone can reverse an overdose and, with training, can be administered by just about anyone. Aaron Payne of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports that the drug is saving lives, but is no silver bullet for the region’s addiction problems. 

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

The international refugee crisis caused by people fleeing the war-torn Middle East has been a high-profile issue in the presidential campaign. Becca Schimmel of Ohio Valley ReSource reports.

Jorfer, Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Appeals Court in Washington will hear arguments Tuesday in the case West Virginia versus the EPA, challenging the federal Clean Power Plan. That’s the centerpiece of the Obama Administration’s attempt to limit carbon emissions from power plants. 

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Murray State University is in the process of conceptualizing learning experiences focused on "student centered" experiences and "experiential learning" - quality factors championed by MSU President Dr. Bob Davies as metrics for performance funding is also underway with state education and government leaders. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf spoke with Davies about these topics, family weekend and an update on the issue of mold appearing in some of the buildings on campus.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

The use of big data is revolutionizing big agriculture: detailed information guides farmers through business transactions, planting schedules, fertilizer applications and far more. This data harvest promises greater profit and greener production techniques. But as Nicole Erwin reports, some thorny questions are cropping up about just who owns the farming data.

Opioid High: Students Face A Different Kind of Test

Sep 12, 2016
Aaron Payne, OVR

It’s not just about notebooks and pencil boxes anymore: the opioid epidemic means back-to-school supplies now include things like emergency overdose treatments and drug prevention plans.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Rural western Kentucky was host to the 'only all-lesbian film festival in the United States' over the weekend. Paducah's Maiden Alley Cinema was home to the inaugural three-day Cinema Systers Film Festival.  Matt Markgraf went to the festival on Saturday and brings this report:

Southwings and Vivian Stockman

The prestigious National Academy of Sciences recently announced a comprehensive study on the health effects of the controversial coal mining practice known as mountaintop removal. For coalfield residents who have long questioned what impact the dust, blasting, chemicals and water contamination was having, the announcement comes as welcome news, if somewhat overdue.  

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