Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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Tyler Olson/123rf Stock Photo

Gov. Matt Bevin is calling for state higher education officials to eliminate some college degree programs if they don’t graduate students who can go into high-demand jobs. In a speech earlier this week, he specifically called out students majoring in “interpretive dance,” a program that isn’t technically offered in Kentucky. Despite this rhetoric, many still believe there’s room for fine arts and liberal arts majors in Kentucky’s state universities.

Guy Mendes/kentuckymonthly.com

  Award-winning author and Graves County native, Bobbi Ann Mason, will be speaking at the Murray State History Department's inaugural lecture and scholarship banquet on September 19th. Tracy Ross speaks with MSU history professor, Duane Bolin, on Sounds Good about the banquet, the lecture, and its featured guest. 

Western Kentucky Botanical Gardens/Facebook

A "Hee Haw"-style skit and bourbon tasting are just some of the features of the upcoming "Backwoods Ball" fundraiser at Western Kentucky Botanical Garden. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Garden co-founder Bill Tyler. They talk about the history of the garden, its origins as a flat, sterile soybean field and more about their fundraising event. 

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

The Environmental Protection Agency is reconsidering its approval of a controversial new form of herbicide that farmers say is damaging millions of acres of soybeans. Some 40 complaints have come from Ohio Valley farmers. Growers are looking for answers, and some suspect a quirk of the region’s climate may be increasing the risk of harm.

Hopkinsville's 30th Annual Pow Wow This Weekend

Sep 8, 2017
Trail of Tears PowWow, Facebook

The 30th Annual Trail of Tears Pow Wow, located in Hopkinsville, KY, happening this weekend.

NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

Murray State University Assistant Professor of Psychology, Michael Bordieri, speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about the psychology of 'awe' regarding the total solar eclipse.

Ignition

Murray State University associate professor of history David Pizzo shares a personal testimony of his time staying in South Africa with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good ahead of the Cinema International showing of 'District 9.' 

MSHA

  President Trump has nominated a retired West Virginia mine executive to lead the nation’s top mine safety agency. David Zatazelo is the former head of Rhino Resources, a coal company that was the focus of scrutiny by regulators in 2011 over safety violations. The nomination comes as mine safety experts are expressing concern over a rash of fatal coal mining accidents. This year, 12 miners have died -- eight of them in West Virginia and Kentucky.

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Another academic year at Murray State University is underway. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with President Bob Davies about his outlook for the semester and the freshmen class, enrollment numbers, how university presidents are addressing the public pension issue, infrastructure needs and health services.

Opioid Emergency: What The Ohio Valley Needs To Combat Crisis

Aug 22, 2017
Rebecca Kiger

The opioid crisis gripping the Ohio Valley is now, according to President Donald Trump, a national emergency. But more than a week after the president made that announcement, state and local health officials in the region told the Ohio Valley ReSource that they have little information about what that emergency declaration actually means, or what additional tools it might provide.

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