Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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Casey Watson

Many volunteer for overseas humanitarian aid trips, traveling thousands of miles and raising thousands of dollars to help others. But what about volunteering at home? Casey Watson explores the dilemma of one nonprofit in Paducah. Starfish Orphan Ministry can find plenty of people willing to travel and to assist children in El Salvador and other countries. But, with the exception of special events, it struggles to find regular volunteers willing to help address the needs of people in its own city. 

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

In a two-part conversation on Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Murray State President Dr. Bob Davies, recapping some of the takeaways from the Board of Regents meeting last Friday. In the first part, they discuss the status of free speech on college and university campuses and Davies thoughts on free speech at Murray State. They also talk about the budget planning process for the next fiscal year and how the university is navigating a budget reduction of $4.5 million as it relates to enrollment and tuition. In the second part, they discuss the experiential learning EDGE Center, the Center for International Business and Trade in Paducah and why this year's Presidential Lecture has a focus on diversity in higher education. 

Courtesy Mountain Comprehensive Care

Rural hospitals and health clinics often cope with some of the sickest and oldest patients, operating on razor-thin margins. Some care providers worry that their job could get even tougher. As part of an occasional series, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores the potential effects of ending the Affordable Care Act. Mary Meehan of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports that repealing Obamacare could leave rural health care in crisis. 

Murray-Calloway Chamber of Commerce via Facebook

The Murray-Calloway County Chamber of Commerce recently took a trip with nearly 30 community leaders to Frankfort to discuss state-level issues that could impact the region. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with local chamber president and CEO Aaron Dail about some of the economic development issues that emerged out of the meeting and how to address some of the needs moving forward.

Courtesy Teamsters Local 175

 

The Ohio Valley once helped give rise to the labor movement. Now the region is seeing a move toward “right-to-work” laws, which unions oppose. Proponents say the laws attract new businesses but opponents say there’s little evidence to support that. Becca Schimmel of the Ohio Valley ReSource has a closer look. 

Closing Clinics: Abortion Rights Increasingly Out Of Reach

Feb 13, 2017
Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

Since the beginning of the year, two abortion clinics in Kentucky and West Virginia have closed, leaving each state with just one such facility. In Ohio the number of clinics has dropped by half in recent years, a trend abortion opponents celebrate. But as Mary Meehan of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports, abortion rights advocates worry that state-level restrictions are putting the right to choose out of reach.

comer.house.gov, cropped

While Congressman James Comer has served as Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner and spent more than a decade in the Kentucky House of Representatives, he is new to Washington D.C., having won the District 1 seat in western Kentucky last November, formerly held by Rep. Ed Whitfield. Comer stopped by WKMS on his way to a speaking engagement to speak with Matt Markgraf about his thoughts on President Trump, legislative priorities, trade deals and hemp.

Shame To Acclaim: Tracking The Unlikely Path Of Appalachian Food

Feb 7, 2017
cokemomo, 123rf Stock Photo

It seems like every few years, Appalachian food gets “rediscovered” by mainstream media outlets as an up-and-coming culinary trend. There are many emotional implications of Appalachian cuisine’s surge in popularity. Ashlie Stevens of member station WFPL has more.

Courtesy Nationwide Children’s Hospital

The Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis is reaching a new generation as the number of drug affected babies rises at an astonishing rate. 

Courtesy Patrick Ford

One of the Trump Administration’s first actions was to freeze all grants issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The freeze only lasted about a week. But as Glynis Board of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports it brought attention -- and uncertainty -- to an EPA program that has pumped billions of dollars into the region.

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