Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

A little over two weeks ago, we spoke with two professors of Murray State's history department who were among the 72 Kentucky history professors who signed a letter calling for the removal of the statue of Confederate president and Kentucky native Jefferson Davis from the capitol rotunda in Frankfort. The letter went to Governor Steve Beshear and to the Kentucky Historical Properties Advisory Commission, which earlier this August voted 7-2 to keep the statue where it is. But that doesn't mean the debate is over. On Sounds Good, Todd Hatton speaks with Dr. Tom Hiter, former Director of Heritage Defense for the Sons of Confederate Veterans and longtime SCV member Dr. Don Duncan.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Murray chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Captain Wendell Oury Chapter, is hosting a Colonial Dinner on October 19, with a menu featuring foods in the style of the colonial times at The Willow Bistro. The restaurant is the historic 1929 home of Price Doyle, a prominent music professor at Murray State and his wife was one of the charter members of the local DAR chapter. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Treasurer Kathy Timmons about the event and the organization.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University has a diverse and growing community of international students and we are interested in learning more about them. Matt Markgraf recently met Aydan Aslanova a student from Azerbaijan who is involved in the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority at MSU. They talk about what she's studying, her hometown of Baku, and learn why chivalry and smiling are different in the United States compared to her home country.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The United States Air Force Band of Mid-America plays a free concert at Murray State University's Lovett Auditorium on October 15, their first concert in the area as they tour the Midwest. On Sounds Good, Austin Carter speaks with Mark Welch, Director of Community Relations & Alumni Affairs, and Dennis Johnson, Director of Bands and Orchestras, about how the upcoming concert came about and what the audience should expect in the repertoire.

Over this past summer, long-time public radio host Garrison Keillor announced his retirement from A Prairie Home Companion, in a slow transition during their 2015-2016 season. His replacement is singer and mandolinist (and for a time a Murray State student) Chris Thile best known as part of Nickel Creek and Punch Brothers. Commentator Dr. Brian Clardy grew up listening to A Prairie Home Companion and says the change prompts him to reflect on other transitions in life.

Andrzej Wilusz, 123rf stock photo

The majority of people who go to see a mental health professional end up saying they feel better afterwards, which is great news, so then does it even matter which techniques are being used if anything will help? This is an argument that pops up in psychology circles where some believe technique doesn't matter and therapists should just do what they feel is right, says Dr. Michael Bordieri of the Murray State Psychology Department. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri on why he disagrees with this approach and gives some examples of psychological treatments that have led to harmful results.

This week, the Pennyroyal Arts Council kicks off "The Big Read," a six-week community wide reading adventure, with the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The focus honors Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. The kick-off event welcomes special guest speaker Mary Badham the actress who played Scout in the 1962 film, a dramatic performance, a gospel choir, film clips, art from local high schools and free books. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Alissa Keller about the schedule of events through November.

The Old Farmer's Almanac is the longest published periodical in North America, in continuous publication since 1792. Their 2016 edition was released in September and Tracy Ross speaks with Senior Associate Editor, Sarah Perreault about the new issue, methodologies for weather forecasting and work underway on the 2017 anniversary issue.

Paducah artist, author and retired physician Bill Renzulli has released a trilogy of new books, titled Transitions, Gifts and Notes on a Simple Life. These books are are loosely related poems and prose considering the gifts we give to others, finding comfort in who you are and the philosophy of living a "simple life." On Sounds Good, Austin Carter speaks with Renzulli about his new work. 

Tab Brockman,

It's the middle of the OVC schedule and the Racers Football team is off to a rough start. With a few more games under their belt, the results were the same, but getting those results happened differently. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Voice of the Racers Neal Bradley about the past two games and the two coming up, including the Homecoming game on October 10.