Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

twitter.com/wkms

Taylor Inman, WKMS

The point of greatest eclipse just happens to be outside of Hopkinsville, Kentucky but the folks at an alien festival down the road in Kelly swear it was written in the stars. The Little Green Men Days Festival is an annual celebration remembering when aliens allegedly visited the rural community 62 years ago to the day of the total solar eclipse.

Vatican Observatory Foundation, via Facebook

The Director of the Vatican Observatory is in Hopkinsville to view the total solar eclipse and speak on the confluence of religion and science. Taylor Inman of WKMS News sat down with Brother Guy Consolmagno to discuss how the two are philosophically connected and how the eclipse should be interpreted in Christian faith.

 

NASA, Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Retired NASA astrophysicist Fred Espenak has 'written the book' on eclipses - many, many books, actually. He has seen 27 total solar eclipses and at least one on every continent. Matt Markgraf speaks with Espenak about why you should see the total eclipse, what it is, how to predict one and what kind of gear he's using to take photos of "The Great American Eclipse" on Monday.

Jesse Wright, WVPB

Big-ticket gas pipelines and other energy projects pending in the Ohio Valley have largely been in limbo because the federal body that issues important permits had too many empty seats.

J. Tyler Franklin | wfpl.org

A presidential commission on the opioid crisis delivered its first report last week. Among the recommendations: better sharing of data. Health researchers warn that they don’t have some information critical to addressing the deadliest drug crisis in the country’s history. Some efforts are underway in the Ohio Valley to fill some of the gaps.

Memory Sunday: Churches Spread Alzheimer’s Awareness

Aug 2, 2017
Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

Experts on Alzheimer’s disease say it remains a “silent epidemic” among African-Americans, and that many do not receive the treatment they need. Researchers are joining religious leaders to  use the power of the pulpit to raise awareness.

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

Many towns and cities across the Ohio Valley try to improve their business environment with tax breaks, site development, and other incentives. But how about investing in compassion? A growing body of science points to compassion as an economic driver and more businesses and cities around the region are willing to give compassion a chance.

Rhonda Miller, WKYU

Migrant workers who come to Kentucky under the H2A visa program are a critical part of the agricultural workforce. The Bluegrass State ranks seventh among the 50 states for the number farm workers who come under this visa, according to the Office of Foreign Labor Certification. Phil and Jan Holliday's farm in Logan County has two workers from Mexico who have been coming for more than two decades, and they’re bringing the next generation.      

Healthy Debate: What The Republican Health Bill Taught Us About Medicaid

Jul 24, 2017

As the Senate nears a vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, some Ohio Valley lawmakers and residents are increasingly uneasy with the potential effects. Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia are highly dependent on Medicaid, and proposed changes could have bigger effects here than almost anywhere else in the country. The Ohio Valley ReSource has an analysis of how the heated debate has shed light on the region’s health concerns.

Lisa Autry, WKU Public Radio

A total solar eclipse will cross North America next month for the first time in nearly a century.  And Hopkinsville, Kentucky will be ground zero as day turns to night.  The rural town nestled in western Kentucky will offer the longest opportunity to view the eclipse in the entire world.

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