Morning Edition

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Morning Edition is an American radio news program produced and distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). It airs weekday mornings (Monday through Friday) and runs for two hours, and many stations repeat one or both hours. The show feeds live from 05:00 to 09:00 ET, with feeds and updates as required until noon. The show premiered on November 5, 1979; its weekend counterpart is Weekend Edition. Morning Edition and All Things Considered are the highest rated public radio shows.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Politics Of Trade Under Trump

Dec 5, 2016
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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

President-elect Trump dug in over the weekend on his approach to trade.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

He threatened, quote, "retribution or consequence" for companies that move workers out of the United States and then try to sell goods back to the U.S.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. In this business, we report on things that happen.

Here's something that didn't happen. The Cleveland Browns did not lose. Something they've done every week this season on their way to an 0-12 record.

Of course they didn't play. This was an off week.

Which means Scott Sabol's unruly beard is growing.

The Cleveland weather man promised he wouldn't shave until the Browns won.

They have four more chances, then a long off season, when in Cleveland, it may get as hard to watch forecasts as it is to watch football.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

OK, for more on the politics of the pipeline, we're going to talk now with NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley. He's on the line. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Rachel.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You can re-enact that scene in the old movie Christmas Vacation.

A family goes into a forest and cuts down a ridiculously tall tree.

The U.S. Forest Service is selling Christmas tree removal permits for $5 in the Green Mountain National Forest of Vermont.

You go into the forest. You cut down the tree yourself. There's only one catch: the tree you choose cannot be more than 20 feet tall.

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