Todd Hatton

News Reporter and Host of Morning Edition

Todd Hatton hails from Paducah, Kentucky, where he got into radio under the auspices of the late, great John Stewart of WKYX while a student at Paducah Community College. He also worked at WKMS in the reel-to-reel tape days of the early 1990s before running off first to San Francisco, then Orlando in search of something to do when he grew up. He received his MFA in Creative Writing at Murray State University. He vigorously resists adulthood and watches his wife, Angela Hatton, save the world one plastic bottle at a time.

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2011

2nd Place - Best Enterprise/Investigative Reporting - "Difficulty with BP Boycott"

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2010

1st Place - Best Light News - Market House Theatre Ghost Walk

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2009

2nd Place - Best Use of Sound - Hidden Kitchens

Hon.Men. - Best Light News Feature - Aft. Super Tuesday Storms

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Government
9:41 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Tennessee Justices Let Lethal Injection Ruling Stand

Wikimedia Commons

The Tennessee Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal by two death row inmates who claim changes to the state's lethal injection procedure are unconstitutional.  The state's high court declined Monday to hear the case brought by Stephen Michael West and Billy Ray Irick.

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Crime
9:37 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Prison Educator Faces Rape Charge

Wikimedia Commons

A Kentucky State Penitentiary employee faces rape charges following her arrest for an alleged sexual relationship with an inmate.  Forty-one year old Lori Holsapple of Kuttawa was taken into custody late last week following a two-month state police investigation.  Holsapple worked as an educator at the Eddyville facility, and has been charged with third-degree rape.  KSP Post 1 public affairs officer Trooper Jay Thomas says even though it was a consensual relationship, she received charges of rape due to her employment.

Business
8:59 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Meeting with Honeywell

wikipedia.com

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission plans talks next week in Atlanta with executives from Honeywell’s Metropolis, Ill., plant. The Paducah Sun reports they’ll meet Monday to discuss apparent violations associated with the company’s alleged failure to identify the kinds of accidents significant earthquakes or tornadoes might cause. NRC Public Affairs Officer Roger Hannah says the agency is especially concerned about the potential release of large amounts of uranium hexafluoride.   The meeting will review information presented by the plant.

Education
9:03 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Sen. Durbin Calls for Passage of Student Loan Bill

wikipedia.com

Illinois’ U.S. Senator Dick Durbin is calling on his colleagues to pass his Know Before You Owe Act, a measure that would help college students understand the range of educational loan options before they borrow.  Durbin says most undergraduates with private loans didn’t know they were eligible for safer, and cheaper, federal loans.  Federal student loans have fixed interest rates and offer a range of consumer protections and favorable terms to make repayment more manageable.  By contrast, private loans often have uncapped variable interest rates and few, if any, customer protections.

Government
8:52 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Illinois Governor Signs Payday Lender Law

wikipedia.com

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has signed a new law he says will protect consumers from payday lenders.  Quinn signed the law Monday.  It requires lenders be licensed by the state Department of Financial and Professional Regulation or be charged with a felony. Right now the agency has licensed 522 payday lenders.  The new law also protects consumers who are trapped in high-interest loans from having to pay back the debts, allowing such loans to be declared null and void.

Business
8:44 am
Tue August 21, 2012

USDA: Corn Harvest Ahead of Schedule

wikipedia.com

This year's corn harvest is ahead of schedule with four percent in already, compared with just one percent at this time last year.  The harvest is three to four weeks ahead of schedule in most of the corn belt because an unusually warm spring allowed farmers to plant earlier.  Most then expected a good year, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been reducing its estimates of the nation's harvest amid a severe drought centered over the Midwest.

Culture
9:26 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Plans for New Fort Campbell Museum Scaled Back

wikipedia.com

An organization trying to raise money to build a new museum at Fort Campbell says it has scaled back plans for the project.  Fort Campbell Historical Foundation Executive Director Robert Nichols says changes in the design will cut the cost for the Wings of Liberty project in half. Originally, the organization had planned a two-floor, 80,000 square-foot structure at a cost of about $40 million.

Government
9:20 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Court Won't Hear Challenge to God Reference

wikipedia.com

The Kentucky Supreme Court has declined to hear a challenge to a ruling allowing a reference to "Almighty God" in the state’s homeland security law.  The Courier-Journal reports justices issued a brief order last week saying they would not review the case, which was brought by several residents represented by the group American Atheists.

Government
8:43 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Haslam Aide: Tennessee Not Promoting Islamic Code

wikipedia.com

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is responding to what it calls confusion about the role of a Muslim staffer and a council that has advised two state departments on Islamic affairs.  Haslam was criticized this summer by several Republican groups over what they perceived as the growing influence of a version of the Islamic code called Shariah in state government.  Deputy to the governor Claude Ramsey sent a letter last week to the state GOP's executive committee seeking to quell those concerns.  Ramsey stated there is no effort under way to promote Shariah law in Tennessee.

Culture
9:00 am
Sun August 19, 2012

The Imposter at Maiden Alley Cinema

The Imposter plays this weekend at Paducah’s Maiden Alley Cinema.  It tells the story of a Texas family whose 13-year-old son goes missing only to be found three years later, thousands of miles away in Spain.  Or so it would seem.  Critics have praised the film, calling it “noir-ish” and a “gothic” thriller.  It’s also a true story.  The documentary blends reality and re-creation as those involved related what happened, and how it happened.  Maiden Alley’s Larry Thomas and I take a look at The Imposter.

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