Todd Hatton

Morning Edition Host, Producer

Todd Hatton hails from Paducah, Kentucky, where he got into radio under the auspices of the late, great John Stewart of WKYX while a student at Paducah Community College. He also worked at WKMS in the reel-to-reel tape days of the early 1990s before running off first to San Francisco, then Orlando in search of something to do when he grew up. He received his MFA in Creative Writing at Murray State University. He vigorously resists adulthood and watches his wife, Angela Hatton, save the world one plastic bottle at a time.

Ways to Connect

Alexandra Kanik, Ohio Valley ReSource

Whoever wins the presidency in 2016, one of the central issues they'll face is the concern of many voters that American jobs are falling victim to free trade while wages stagnate. Murray State University Professor Emeritus of History and Commentator Dr. Bill Schell breaks down this concern and offers a way the next White House occupant could address it.

McCracken County Public Library, Facebook

Pat Fitzhugh, author of The Bell Witch: The Full Account, gives tonight's Evenings Upstairs presentation at the McCracken County Public Library. Legends of the Bell Witch center around the Bell Farm in northern middle Tennessee where there were documented accounts of a disembodied voice physically attacking the family and visitors. Fitzhugh talks tells the story and previews the lecture with Todd Hatton on Sounds Good.

Murray State University Theatre, Facebook

On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross and Todd Hatton speak with MSU Music Department Professor Maribeth Crawford and members of the cast for Little Shop of Horrors about this weekend's production.

arcadiapublishing.com

Most considerations of the American Civil War tend to center on the places where the Union and Confederate armies clashed: Gettysburg, Shiloh, Antietam, Vicksburg, or Chickamauga.

A new book from western Kentucky historian John Cashon, Paducah and the Civil War, makes the case that the River City belongs on that list as well.

Calloway County Public Library, Facebook

Sandy Linn talks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about upcoming events and activities at the Calloway County Public Library.

mtkenton.com

Robert Worden, chairman of the board of directors for Mount Kenton Cemetery in Paducah, talks with Todd Hatton on Sounds Good about the non-profit’s ongoing efforts to identify those buried at the cemetery and find their family members.

Microphone Photo: Image Credit: By Lucasbosch (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

WKMS begins accepting your submissions for our Short Storytelling Contest on September 15th.

courts.ky.gov

Kentucky Supreme Court Justice Bill Cunningham will present a talk on the history of the Kentucky State Penitentiary at Eddyville Thursday, Sept. 8 at the McCracken County Public Library as part of their Evenings Upstairs program. 

And he's uniquely qualified for the job.

Cunningham has had a long professional association with the Kentucky State Penitentiary in Eddyville; as a public defender, a Commonwealth's Attorney, a Circuit Court Judge, and now in his present position on the Commonwealth's highest court.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Murray-Calloway County Endowment for Health Care will use an Arts Access Grant from the Kentucky Arts Council to support hands-on arts experiences over the next year. The project is entitled “Hope & Glory: The Art of Inclusion.” Award-winning writer Constance Alexander, Murray Art Guild Executive Director Debi Danielson and Murray State University Professor Nicole Hand speak with Todd Hatton on Sounds Good on how arts-related programming and community outreach will celebrate adults with disabilities and increase awareness of their contributions to the community’s well-being.

Vandana Khanna

Indian American poet Vandana Khanna speaks with Todd Hatton on Sounds Good ahead of her reading next week at MSU's Clara M. Eagle Gallery, part of Murray State's 2016 Creative Writing MFA Summer Residency. Khanna’s work has won the Crab Orchard Review First Book Prize and the Miller Williams Arkansas Poetry Prize as well as been nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

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