Todd Hatton

News Reporter and Host of Morning Edition

Todd Hatton hails from Paducah, Kentucky, where he got into radio under the auspices of the late, great John Stewart of WKYX while a student at Paducah Community College. He also worked at WKMS in the reel-to-reel tape days of the early 1990s before running off first to San Francisco, then Orlando in search of something to do when he grew up. He received his MFA in Creative Writing at Murray State University. He vigorously resists adulthood and watches his wife, Angela Hatton, save the world one plastic bottle at a time.

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2011

2nd Place - Best Enterprise/Investigative Reporting - "Difficulty with BP Boycott"

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2010

1st Place - Best Light News - Market House Theatre Ghost Walk

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2009

2nd Place - Best Use of Sound - Hidden Kitchens

Hon.Men. - Best Light News Feature - Aft. Super Tuesday Storms

Ways To Connect

NASA/Apollo 17 crew; taken by either Harrison Schmitt or Ron Evans / National Aeronautics and Space Administration

"Where did we come from?" is one of the biggest questions we wrestle with.  Some will say the answers lie only in science; others will say religion is the sole source of truth.  And some from both sides say the two sides are irreconcilable.  But are they?  Two Murray State University professors are giving a presentation tonight that asserts that, far from conflicting, science and religion are in harmony when it comes to where our planet and all its life came from.  Todd Hatton speaks with Dr. Josh Ridley of Murray State's Institute of Engineering and Dr.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Two adorable little puppies visited WKMS today, Frankie and Lincoln. They are basset hound/Jack Russell terrier mixes, approximately six weeks old and four pounds each. Lincoln is brown and white, seems to take after his father's basset hound traits with a larger body, wider feet and a laid back demeanor. Frankie is black and white with spots on her legs. She has more terrier qualities, a little more adventurous and energetic than her brother. On Sounds Good, Todd Hatton meets the puppies with Kathy Hodge of the Humane Society of Calloway County and learns more about Barkaid coming to Murray.

Wikimedia Commons/The National Institute on Drug Abuse

African American women in the South’s rural areas are less likely to suffer from depression than those who live in Southern urban areas.  That’s according to a new study from the University of Michigan.  The study uses data from the National Survey of American Life to examine how poverty and low education affect mental illness in black and white women living in the rural South.  

(Photo courtesy of John Scopes, Jr.)

What makes a person voluntarily step into the middle of one of the most controversial and contentious issues of modern times? And what makes them voluntarily step back out?

Western Kentucky native John Thomas Scopes volunteered to be the defendant in a much-ballyhooed trial testing a law he opposed, a law banning the teaching of human evolution in Tennessee. He stood on principle in an intense spotlight... and when the trial was over, he stepped back out, determined to live his own life. But, history was not finished with him just yet.


Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Today we meet Hansel, a happy, energetic shih tzu/pug mix available for adoption at the Humane Society of Calloway County. He seemed to be smiling the entire time he was at WKMS and enjoyed all of the attention. Kathy Hodge of the Humane Society says he was found running around with a pack of dogs when he was brought in, with matted fur and underweight. He's recovered well, only barks when significant and sits for treats. Hansel seems like a good fit for a young family with lots of energy. In the interview, Hodge also talks about how to volunteer from fostering to driving dogs to rescues and a remarkable story about a poor beagle.

jerryrhoads.org

  Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has appointed former Madisonville state Sen. Jerry Rhoads to Murray State University's Board of Regents.

Rhoads replaces outgoing board member Constantine Curris, whose term expires this year.

Gage Skidmore, Flickr (Creative Commons License)

  Kentucky Attorney General and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway says the Jefferson Davis statue in the Capitol rotunda belongs elsewhere, and he’ll urge the agency that oversees the state’s historic properties to move it.  

Kentucky State Police

A recently-graduated Kentucky state trooper was killed Tuesday evening in a two-vehicle wreck near Grand Rivers.  23-year-old Trooper Eric Chrisman of Lawrenceburg was responding to a reckless driving complaint on US 62 approximately two miles west of Grand Rivers when he lost control of his vehicle, crossed into the other lane, and hit a tractor-trailer truck.  Chrisman was pronounced dead at the scene.  The other driver was treated at Marshall County Hospital and released. 

Lance Dennee

Paducah officials have announced a contract with Owensboro-based LinGate Hospitality to build a new hotel on the city's riverfront. 

Steve Barrett/NPR

  

  The U.S. Supreme Court is set to rule soon on a challenge to Kentucky’s and three other states’ gay marriage bans.  The outcome is expected to settle the national issue of gay marriage.  

NPR’s Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg has been following the issue as it moves through the court system.

Pages