Ryland Barton

Kentucky Public Radio State Capitol Reporter

Ryland is the state capitol reporter for Kentucky Public Radio. He's covered politics and state government for NPR member stations KWBU in Waco and KUT in Austin. Always looking to put a face to big issues, Ryland's reporting has taken him to drought-weary towns in West Texas and relocated communities in rural China. He's covered breaking news like the 2014 shooting at Fort Hood Army Base and the aftermath of the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas. 

Ryland has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago and a master's degree in journalism from the University of Texas. He grew up in Lexington.

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

A new proposal to overhaul Kentucky’s public pension systems has been filed in the state Senate. Senate Republican leaders say it differs greatly from a version pushed by Gov. Matt Bevin last fall.

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Gov. Matt Bevin has filed a lawsuit in response to a legal challenge over Kentucky’s new Medicaid work requirement.

BankingBum, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

This week in Frankfort, the debate over gun control flared up again after a mass shooting at a school in Florida. Lawmakers have proposed a handful of bills to deal with guns this legislative session, but most of them expand where guns can be carried. 

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Kentuckians wouldn’t be able to get married until they’re 18 years old, under a bill being considered by the state legislature.

Currently, Kentuckians can get married when they’re 16 if they have permission from their parents. Women can get married at younger ages if they’re pregnant — there is no lower limit.

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Republican lawmakers are hoping to overhaul Kentucky’s workers compensation laws with a bill that would cap how long people with some permanent on-the-job injuries can collect benefits, among other things.

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Republican leaders of the state legislature say a new proposal to overhaul the state’s public retirement systems will be unveiled later this week.

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The state will begin compensating Kentuckians who serve as foster parents to children they’re related to after a federal court ruling last fall.

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Evidence in Louisville criminal cases will no longer be available for public scrutiny, according to a new rule approved by Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton.

Ryland Barton

The opposing leaders of the U.S. Senate shared a stage at the University of Louisville on Monday, the same day the chamber is set to begin an open debate on bills dealing with immigration.

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  This week in Frankfort, lawmakers began to consider bills that would make it harder for people to sue for medical malpractice and other types of damages; a handful of school districts would be able to borrow money from the state to stay afloat under a new proposal; and there’s still no pension bill a little over a month into the legislative session.

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